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    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2020 edited
     
    Trina and I are thinking of selling our present house, and building this next door.
      Kensington Kitome Plan.PNG
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      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2020
     
    Looks nice. You've misspelled Library as Lounge though :)
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2020
     
    LOL! Looks like Remy is making his own plans for your house, Quenten :P

    Do you have winters there? I think it might be quite cold with all those windows if you do. Otherwise, with a few nice hanging baskets and flowering climbers it would be heavenly :)

    Oh wait! Now I'm doing it!

    Sorry!
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2020
     
    Winters... as in never below 0.5C in the middle of the night? A fire at night, and doona are sufficient. And all our front wall facing NW is floor to floor windows in our present house, and we have no problem. Summers are a different thing - this year we had days over 40C, but the summer days rarely go over 32C in normal years - if we ever have one again.

    The lounge is too small for a library, Remy! Bed 2 & 3 will be made 1 room - the Library; The dining, study and lounge wall will be eliminated creating one big open area, so I can have my computer desk with a view, and still be in touch with Trina (as we have now, in a much smaller house). The builders will have to let us know if it is possible. We are definitely thinking seriously about this project.

    Sue, with the views we have (and I think you have seen them) it is fantastically heavenly enough. But Trina is the gardener extraordinaire, so we shall see.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2020
     
    Posted By: QuentenThe lounge is too small for a library, Remy! Bed 2 & 3 will be made 1 room - the Library; The dining, study and lounge wall will be eliminated creating one big open area, so I can have my computer desk with a view, and still be in touch with Trina (as we have now, in a much smaller house). The builders will have to let us know if it is possible.
    Cool. I was thinking of mentioning that myself, I felt that house had a little bit too much unnecessary wallage.
    • CommentAuthorkevbeck43
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2020
     
    What measurement model are you using? Maybe I am being ignorant but if you are using feet as your scale unless I'm missing something entirely your bedroom is over a mile wide! Forgive my ignorance I am just curious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2020
     
    Looks like millimeters to me.
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2020
     
    Monsen is right - all measurements in buildings in Australia tend to be in mm
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2020
     
    Not meters ? Egad. I wouldn't deal well with milimeters unless I was talking about game miniatures.
    •  
      CommentAuthorRalf
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    The advantage is you usually don't have to deal with fractions! Can you imagine the hassle I have with anglophile documents with use the . as a decimal separator instead of the , as we do here in Grmany! :D
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    I have sympathy for you, Ralf. I was taught imperial till I was 7 and had the barest grasp of it, then metric from that point on. Now I never get anything right at all. Its like learning to count and do complicated sums in base 4, 8, 12, and 16, then finally being told that all that is useless now and no one should ever use anything but base 10.

    Early learning affects us in much deeper ways than people can possibly understand. They really didn't know how badly it would affect all us youngsters when they forced the UK to go metric.
    • CommentAuthorShessar
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    I remember when the US tried to convert to metric in the mid 1970's. It caused everyone over the age of five to let out one great gasp of horror and protest. LOL
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    Well, I had a discussion with someone at my last job about this. They refused to believe the US measurements were a modification of the older British measurements. Then I pointed out that England is metric and gave up inches, and miles, etc. I thought they were going to launch themselves into the upper atmosphere.
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTime4 days ago edited
     
    I remember when they did it in Oz - currency when I was 16, measurements for everything several years later, then road speeds and distances - we all got free stickers to put on our odometers, and no new car could be sold with miles. Yes, we hated the transition, but Aussies get over unbelievable hardships that put the whole nation at risk of imminent extermination, like converting to metric, and now we all love it - even my 91 year old Mum. But I do understand that USA and UK have weaker constitutions than us. They say drinking a cold Aussie beer toughens you up to enable you to handle the apocalypse of metric conversion. BTW, it's METRES, not METERS... at least this is the way it is spelled in English.
    • CommentAuthortaustinoc
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    Posted By: LoopysueEarly learning affects us in much deeper ways than people can possibly understand. They really didn't know how badly it would affect all us youngsters when they forced the UK to go metric.


    Up to about the age of five or so, the human brain is incredibly flexible, to the point where it physically structures itself around the tasks it is performing. This is why it is such a challenge for an adult to master a new language, while with very young children, you really can't stop them from learning a language that is spoken around them regularly.

    Quenten: Aussies are weird, and if you can survive living in a place where everything is trying to kill you all the time, you can survive anything.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTime4 days ago edited
     
    Posted By: taustinoc
    Posted By: LoopysueEarly learning affects us in much deeper ways than people can possibly understand. They really didn't know how badly it would affect all us youngsters when they forced the UK to go metric.


    Up to about the age of five or so, the human brain is incredibly flexible, to the point where it physically structures itself around the tasks it is performing. This is why it is such a challenge for an adult to master a new language, while with very young children, you really can't stop them from learning a language that is spoken around them regularly...


    I was 7 when it happened, and it was the critical moment when I rebelled and changed the course of my life forever. I was considered to be good at maths before then - advanced for my age. But I distinctly remember scowling back at my teacher and telling her that I couldn't be bothered with learning the new system when I'd spent all my life (7 years of it) learning the old one. My argument was that the fact that it could change at all meant that the new system might only be around for a couple of years before it was itself rubbished and a third one brought in, so why bother?

    I must have been a really difficult child! :P

    This single moment in my life when I first ever stood up and rejected anything the slightest bit mathematical as a reaction to what I felt was a total betrayal of my trust in learning it all, was the moment the dreamer and artist in me started to take over. If it hadn't happened I would probably have grown up quite differently, and all this art would never have happened. Art is the only thing where the principles will never change - colour, shading, line, shape, form. Art will never betray me like maths did.
  1.  
    As a soldier for much of my adult life, we constantly had to deal in both systems. For example the speedometers and odometers on the vehicles were usually in MPH/Miles. But the maps we used had 1000 meter grid squares, but some had elevation in feet. The the maps at Fort Riley (previously at 20 foot contour intervals) got switched to 20 meter contour intervals. Suddenly, you couldn't find your way around because the maps were, not flat, but much more shallow in slope. Eventually we got used to it.

    Then of course sailors talk in nautical miles and knots. So do aviators. But the last time I checked they measure fuel in pounds, and altitude in feet.

    For the simulation I worked on, we converted everything to metric (and it stayed metric) inside the system, but we we eventually customized it so people could choose the UOM they wanted to deal with.
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    Fuel in hundreds of gallons. But I was on a DDG, not a small boat.
    • CommentAuthorthehawk
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    My experience in the military was that we had to deal in SI and EES, as well as be aware of how Imperial units were different. We were also not allowed to use 'point' anything, we had to use 'decimal' because we never knew who we might be dealing with.

    The part I don't get about US switching to metric is that native United Statesians are overall as a group and a culture the laziest people I know (and of course, all generalizations being false, there are a lot of people who are not this way) - and metric is so much easier to work with.
    • CommentAuthorShessar
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    United Statesian?! Perfect.

    Q. How does a United Statesian change a light bulb?

    A. They don't, because a United Statesian never changes anything.

    LOL
    • CommentAuthortaustinoc
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    Posted By: thehawkThe part I don't get about US switching to metric is that native United Statesians are overall as a group and a culture the laziest people I know (and of course, all generalizations being false, there are a lot of people who are not this way) - and metric is so much easier to work with.


    We're not only lazy, we're short-sighted, too. Switching to metric might be less work in the long run, but the switch itself is more work right now than keeping everything the same.

    Or, to quote the despair.com poster:

    Procrastination



    Hard work often pays off after time, but laziness always pays off now.

    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTime4 days ago edited
     
    Yeah for procrastinators. I am the founding Procrastitrump-in-chief! 3:)

    And taustinoc, they only try to kill you for 23 hours a day, not all the time. I hate exaggeration. Plus, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger.
  2.  
    I was going to go to a Procrastinator's Anonymous meeting, but I decided to wait 'till tomorrow…
    • CommentAuthortaustinoc
    • CommentTime3 days ago
     
    Posted By: Maidhc O CasainI was going to go to a Procrastinator's Anonymous meeting, but I decided to wait 'till tomorrow…


    S'Okay. The meeting was rescheduled for next week anyway.
  3.  
    :D