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  1.  
    I just installed this for CC3+ and when I followed the instructions for drawing the contour lines "On paper maps the shading method uses strokes of varying weight to show slopes of different varying strength. Click the Terrain drawing tools and select the Slope 1 tool. This is the lightest slope. Use it to outline your hills and elevations as shown here." I find the Terrain Drawing Tools and it says something like I don't have any drawing tools for that type of operation. So, since my CC3 installation is still on my computer, I tried it there as well and I get the same problem.

    When I use the Contour Line button, I just get a regular line.

    Any ideas?
    • CommentAuthorWyvern
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2019
     
    Mike, right-click when your mouse cursor is over the Default Terrain icon with the Annual 32 Napoleonic Battle Maps file you're working on open in CC3+. This will call up the Select Drawing Tool window, from where you can choose the appropriate Slope drawing tool for your purposes.

    Don't left-click, as that just calls up the error box you mentioned. Not sure why it does that, but hopefully this will resolve the issue for you. Good luck!
  2.  
    Right clicking works, but what I thought would be "hash marks" to indicate slope is instead a series of circles, as can be seen here.

    Note that the shapes in the Symbol Catalog show CA32 Slope while the fill shows CA30 Slope. No hashes. It also saves as a CC3 Map instead of a CC3Plus map.
      Napoleonic Test.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2019
     
    The pattern is as it should be, it is exactly the same as is used in the example maps. But I am guessing the scale of your map is really small, meaning the fill turns out way too large (The wizard recommends a minimum map size of 4000x3200, the fill is designed to look nice in that scale by default)

    I am guessing the CA30 vs CA32 is just a mis-labeling when the style was made (Perhaps it was intended to be issue 30? There are a couple of such mislabelings through the history of the annuals).

    There is no difference between a CC3 and a CC3 plus map. CC3+ puts things in the map CC3 won't understand, but the map format itself is exactly the same. CC3+ still uses the plain "CC3" reference in many places, but this is just a labeling thing.
    • CommentAuthormike robel
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2019 edited
     
    Monson, Ok thanks. I switched to a larger map and instead of making large hills, made smaller masses and it looks better, but still was not I expected to see. I was hoping to be able to get the look of period maps of the LIttle Bighorn battlefield, so rather more like this. Perhaps a different approach is required. :)
      mapA.jpg
    • CommentAuthorWyvern
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2019
     
    Mike, you may care to look at Annual 26 Fantasy Realms, as the hill style used in that is probably the closest I can recall to what you're after here. You'll need to adjust the line styles and thicknesses if the Little Big Horn map style is what you're really after, but that shouldn't be too onerous. It IS a labour-intensive drawing style, but when you look at such hand-drawn maps, that's going to be unavoidable, and I imagine you'd be prepared for that already! If not, you've been warned now ;)
  3.  
    Wyvern,

    Thanks very much. Those actually look good. I wouldn't want to do it on a huge map.

    Mike
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2019
     
    That is a great looking map !
    • CommentAuthormike robel
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2019
     
    JimP,

    Yes, but it is not mine. Its the product of an Army Engineer in 1876 (I think). They didn't use contour lines back then.
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2019
     
    I have an old topo map from about 1920.