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    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    I thought I would share the first map I completed with CC3+. This was done after a couple of aborted attempts while I was learning the program. The map is for the first book in a series of epic fantasy novels I am writing. I wanted to get it done for the release of the manuscript to my beta readers. This map was completed about four days after purchasing the software. The map has a couple minor touch-ups added after it was released with the beta version of my book. The map uses the Mike Schley Overland Style. I was very pleased with the results (although I knew I could do better with scale of some of the icons and labels). My readers were quite impressed, also. I had long wanted to make a better map than the hand-drawn scribble I had used for reference while writing. I checked out many map making programs, and—after much research—chose CC3+. I am not disappointed in my choice.

    I purchased Remy's tome with my initial purchase of the software, but I didn't read much of it until after I completed the map. All my effort was put into trying to meet my tight deadline for release of the beta (which coincided with a family reunion I was about to attend. The map was ready just before driving from Kentucky to Oklahoma City. Most of what I learned was by doing and searching for help when I ran into a roadblock. I also viewed some of Joe Sweeny's videos to get me pointed in the right direction.
      Of Prophets and Kings Beta.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    Here is my original, hand-drawn map that served as my only geographic reference from around 2006 until 17 July 2018.
      Original Map.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    Here is a map I did of the entire continent for my reference use only. I used the Jonathan Roberts Overland Style. I tried a some variations in a few places which I left (since the map was strictly for my personal reference and not for release into the wild).
      The Continent added Valimere 4 Share Version.PNG
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    This is the same map with showing political boundaries. They are isolated on layers and can be turned on and off. This I believe I learned by reading Remy's magnificent tome.
      The Continent added Valimere 4 Share Version Political.PNG
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018 edited
     
    Yes! A fantasy world how it should be, i like the distribution of plains, steppe etc., my favorite is the dragon teeth mountains with the wastelands. Also the version with the political borders makes me curious to get more infos of the world. Maybe you can provide a more high res version, then I could give more feedback if you wish.
    One recommendation: Maybe play a bit around with the edge fade, inner sheet effect on the Sardan Yak Kaviri/Northern Reaches. I like this effect very much, but this is just my opinion.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    Thanks for the comments Jensen. It is hard to see the fade at this resolution. I plan to make more polished regional maps off this to be included in the books.

    I have some higher resolution version here: https://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=42243 There are also some shots of the new Elandia map I am working on using the Jonathan Roberts style. It is on hold until I make some symbols for the cities. I have been waiting as I develop my drawing skills in SketchBook.

    I did a hand-draw map that is over on the Cartographers Guild to work on my drawing skills. I enjoy making maps using a drawing tablet and SketchBook and I enjoy making maps with CC3+. Two different tools and some projects call for one or the other.
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    I love this that you show us these early maps of yours - and you know, they are maps that really speak to me. I just love your work - any chance of joining us in the Community Atlas - we would love to have a mapper of your skill with us.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    Thank you for the kind comments Quenten. I am up to my eyeball in maps to do for my books—most of them for my own reference. After doing a few maps, I have discovered they really open up my world for me and I gain so much more understanding of this setting I have created (and am creating still).

    I wanted to share my maps here so that in some small way I can help demonstrate the capabilities of this software and inspire others. Hopefully people can learn from what I have done and the mistakes I have made along the way that will improve their own mapping making—as I have done from what others have been so generous to share. One mapmaker whose work has really inspired me is Jonathan Roberts. I really appreciate his website (http://www.fantasticmaps.com/) and the tutorials he has posted there.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    There's a lot to be said for making lots of reference maps :)

    I just wish I could get past that stage and actually write something! LOL!

    These are great - thanks for sharing them.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    Thank you ,Sue. I had just finished my revision (6th or 7th, i lost count) of book one getting it ready to send out to beta readers when I got CC3+. After one map, the amount I learned told me I had to map out several other areas before I could get back to writing. Book two has been sitting since that time waiting for revision (6 or 7) to also go beta.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    Don't do what I did and simply stop writing because the mapping was so much fun! :P
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    I definitely plan to get back at the writing, Sue. I just want to have all my facts in order...and the mapping IS so much fun.
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018 edited
     
    mapping is writing :-)
    mapping is creating
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    aaah, I checked your CG link and got the high res version. The interesting thing for me with your way of mapping is, that it goes in an opposite direction compared to I do maps. Your map is cristal clear, straight borders, straight breaks, good-to-get information. The ideal I go for in my maps is kind of an impressionistic, psychadelic action movie that triggers ideas. Maybe because I‘ve read too much books from Tanith Lee, they are a great source of inspiration for me. And I really like how you used the Jon Roberts style. It‘s my favorite one and most of my maps I began in this style also but went in a complete different direction. Looking forward to see more.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Thank you for the comments, Jensen. We all approach things a little different and the more we learn and develop the more we fall into our own style—and that's a good thing. It would become extremely boring if all our maps looked the same—no matter how well they were done. I am a perfectionist by nature. It is a blessing and it is a curse. It drives me to do my best, but nothing I do looks quite good enough to me. Purpose also drives style and technique. A map used on the cover of a book for illustration may look quite different than a map inside a book to convey geographic information, for example.

    Jon Roberts is my favorite style and it fits my vision for what I want to accomplish best in most cases. I also really like the Mike Schley style and I like the fact it comes standard with the base program. You can make some really lovely maps with it. There are several other styles I want to try when I have the appropriate project to try them out.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Some notes on the creation of map one.

    To transform the hand-drawn relic to a CC3 map I imported it into CC3 as a bitmap and placed ii on the bottom of the layer stack (i.e. on top of everything else) and set transparency to about 50%. This way I could set it whenever I wanted and it would never be covered up (except for what I was working on at the moment until the map refreshed) and I could see through it to see what I had done. If I didn't want to see it, I simply turned-off the layer. I got this technique from either a YouTube video I viewed or from the Tome—I don't remember where.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Here is a shot of a remapping of the Elandia map using the Jonathan Roberts Overland style. I got this far and realize the trees were too small. That massive forest was planted one tree at a time. The waterfall was done by painting it on a JR cliff symbol and importing the modified symbol. I also had to modify some others to make the cliff run like I wanted. The lone mountain by the village is from the Midgard style in Annual Volume Seven. There is another waterfall I made by the city in the mountains just south of the pass on the eastern border.
      Greater Elandia 4 lost effort cropped.png
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    I like this a lot, but feel the settlement symbols a bit large and overpowering (I fully expect Remy Monsen to disagree, since he favours large, and I favour small)
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018 edited
     
    This is not a good shot to judge them by because it is zoomed in a bit and not showing the entire map. The map is comparable in size to the original posted above.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    I am debating about making unique symbols for each settlement that captures the flavor of each one... or using simple markers.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2018
     
    The big map is just short of 1000 leagues across from east to west, which (if a league is 3 miles) is wider than the USA. I suppose it depends on how big you print the map - A3 or wall-sized.


    I think the relative scale of different kinds of symbols might be a little discomforting. What I mean by that is that we are more familiar with seeing regional maps where all the symbols are set to the same scale as each other - usually the default scale of 1. (Yes, I know that's not a scale, because a scale ratio should be a ratio, and not a single figure, but 1 is the default size of the symbols when pasted direct from the catalogue without any fiddling around with the default size).


    Maybe there is a slightly different problem going on here in this particular map though, because apart from the fact that the symbols do not appear to be of a comparable scale with each other (those forts are the size of a city in their own right), they are also apparently of different styles. I can't be certain about that last point because its been a while since I actually mapped anything., but they do seem to be a bit of a mismatch with each other. Maybe try it two different ways? Try using a strict selection of symbols from the same style as the fills mountains and trees, and on the other hand with everything as it is but the cities and forts and things shown at exactly the same scale as each other - and the same scale as the mountains and trees.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2018 edited
     
    Sue,

    You are correct in the 1 league = 3 miles. That is the ratio I used and is the traditional interpretation of a league, though different ratios have been used historically. The map is sized like the first Elandia map, not the continent map. I understand the confusion as there has been not clear delineation in this thread between the two.

    The symbols may in fact be too large. I know the village north of the Dragon Teeth is out of proportion with the village by the Spire (the lone mountain).

    I regards to symbol proportions, I don't necessarily go with default size. I set them manual to match the map. In the first map, the city symbols were too small so I may have over corrected in this attempt. The symbols used are, for the most part, from the JR Overland style. The exceptions being Melekhir, which is a Schley, and Fara'Ri which is two different Schely city symbols combine with JR Overland mountains and some details like a waterfall added in SketchBook then turned into a symbol.

    When I resume this map, I will most likely go with symbols I create from scratch for the cities, forts, and villages since I would like some uniqueness (the map will be included with my books when published) and none of the symbols sets have everything I desire.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2018 edited
     
    Here is the symbol I made for Fara'Ri that I mentioned in the previous post.
      FaraRi.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2018
     
    Here is a shot of the entire map area.
      Greater Elandia 4.PNG
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2018
     
    Don't get me wrong - I really do like this map. Its a beautiful land shape done well in a beautiful style.

    Its just that you went and asked a specific question and I'm a bit of a nut about trying to answer things. Its like an OCD thing with me! :P

    As for the file not showing - Its because you had an apostrophe in the filename. If you take that out the image will show.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2018
     
    Thanks for the help, Sue. In the initial shot of the map I posted, the city symbols clearly appeared oversized. With the scale of the map, I am not sure if simple markers would be better than icons.
    • CommentAuthorseycyrus
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2018
     
    I like the size of the city symbols as they are. Reminds me of the same sort of thing i have tried to do on my own.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2018
     
    Posted By: seycyrusI like the size of the city symbols as they are. Reminds me of the same sort of thing i have tried to do on my own.


    Yes, when you see the map in its entirety they do appear correct. I am still debating the use of simple markers instead, or simpler icons. The walled cities overpower the map a bit I think.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2018
     
    I am also considering making my own mountain symbols. Putting more of my own stamp on the map. I did a completely hand-drawn map to push my art skills which had a mountainous backdrop and now I have just about worked up enough courage to do my own mountain symbols. If I go that route, I will create different sets for the different mountain chains so they have there own distinct character. The Dragon's Teeth will be jagged. The Glakas more weathered and forested.

    There is a river that flows into the Green Lake from the SE that I plan to add mist around similar to the effect around the blue roof fort/city icon. I will do that in post-processing after I finish the map in CC3.

    Hopefully I will get back to this map soon, but right now I'm trapped in Melekhir and they closed the gates and won't let me out.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2018 edited
     
    Some initial work on mountain symbols. Kind of rough drafts as I figure out what I want and how to draw it.
      Mountain E2.png
      Mountain 1.png
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    looking good! I also started own mountains some time ago in PS but stopped after I finished two of them because I thought there are already so many great mountains in CC. But I can understand you, if it would be for an own book, I would also think different than for campaign maps. I like your mountains. just a few more details and you can go with them I think!
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    Thank you, Jensen. These are not quite what I want. I plan to look at some actual images of mountains and try a little replication. These were drawn using no visual references. I also want several variations to place in a range and different sets for different ranges.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    Looks good :)

    I've tried doing sets of mountains before, but I just can't seem to keep the basic style going between one mountain and the next. Mine are all far too... 'individual' (that would be a polite way of putting it :P )

    Best of luck with this :)
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    That is a concern I have, also. I am not nearly skilled enough to have developed anything that could be considered consistent style.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    The best solution I have come up with so far is to do everything of the same type at the same time. By that I mean if I have the pen in my hand and I draw one mountain outline I must draw all the outlines in the same half hour or so without taking any breaks. Then when I get to doing the shading I must do them all at the same time, and so on.

    Even then, there's no guarantee that mum won't call right in the middle of the linework and then the second half of the set looks nothing like the first when I get back to it an hour later :P
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    Also - switch your iPod (or whatever you use for music) OFF random pick, or mountains drawn to heavy metal will look completely different to mountains drawn to reggae! :P
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    What do mountains drawn to Mozart look like?
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018 edited
     
    Three peaks - waltz peaks! :D

    Unless you hit on the funeral march, and then everything is really massive and heavy with flat tops.
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    Mozart was into menuets - waltzes came about 100 years later, most famous being Strauss. Still 3/4 time though.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    I think of them as waltzes because my brother used to play from a big fat book called Chopin Waltzes and Mazurkas.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    I prefer mountains drawn to the classics. Beethoven, Mozart, Lennon and McCartney.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    I think it would be a very interesting experiment to see how different the style of one artist could be when listening to different types of music.

    But if we get around to doing that can it be after Christmas now? I have a whole shedload of other stuff that needs to be finished first! :)
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    Experimenting with something a bit simpler
      Mountain E5.png
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    Nicely drawn :)

    When you start testing them, you might find the bottom fade is a little on the sharp side there, but it really depends on the effect you want to get.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018 edited
     
    I will have some experiment to do.

    Still don't have one I truly like.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018 edited
     
    Getting closer.

    Mountain E6.png
    Had to redo the line work and didn't quite get it right. Original line work was too heavy.

    Mountain E7.png
    Another one.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    Here is one that gets closer to what I want for the Dragon's Teeth.
      Mountain E8.png
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2018
     
    yes, that‘s a good one! fits very well