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    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018 edited
     
    This is a map of the City of Melekhir that is from a series of Fantasy novels I am writing. The background was done in Autodesk Sketchbook and inserted as a bitmap into CC3+
      City of Melekhir size 8.9.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    Here is a tighter view of the map. I am mapping a square mile of space and adding lots of detail. There are three statues in the city that I created symbols for in SketchBook. Last count I was up to 234856 entities. I am pushing CC3+ pretty hard. I plan to map the areas on the other sides of the river in separate version of the map, them combine them when I finish.
      The City of Melekhir 9.2 (Central City) Large View Cropped 10.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    Here is an even closer view of one section of the city. The area on the NE side of the canal was inspired by a section of the City of Utrecht. I viewed it in Google Earth and replicated building and building clusters. For higher resolution images and to see the progress of this map from the start you can view it here https://www.cartographersguild.com/showthread.php?t=42269
      The City of Melekhir 9.2 (Central City).png
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    Very nice. I love the variation and attention to detail. It is time-consuming work, but your work so far looks really nice.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    That's a really great map, and like Monsen says - the details are something special :)
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    Some additional details:
    I have the City Designer add-on. I am using house styles from Bitmap B. All houses are drawn using the drawing tool (except the ones placed by the Random Street tool). I have made several PNG images I used for symbols where none of the supplied symbols worked. The small walls in the city (not the city walls or walls of the garrison) and barrier walls on the canals are the same PNG symbol I created in SketchBook. I used the Random Street tool to layout the houses you can see on the SE corner of the last image, but for the majority of the houses on the map, I had to do them manually the create the desired clusters. I really like the Random Street tool, it just doesn't work for most the houses on this map. The trees are from the Jonathan Roberts City style I believe.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    Monsen,
    Thank you. This map has taken much longer than anticipated. I ended up double the scale after I started which resulted in a fourfold increase in size. I have become quite comfortable with the CC3+ interface and really like the software, but I believe this map is pushing it to its limits.

    Sue,
    Thank you. I have viewed some of your work over on Cartographer's Guild and I am blown away. You have produced some truly amazing maps.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    Thank you :)

    I was wondering if you were the same Texas Jake as over on CG!

    I do sometimes still drop by the Guild, and I rather like your Village of Tashev...
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    I am glad you liked it, Sue. I started that as a result of all the symbols I was making in SketchBook for CC3+. I discovered there was more of an artist in me than I realized.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    LOL!

    Way to go! :D
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    An awe-inspiring city - let's me see what I did not so well in mine, and spurs me to do a better city next time. I really really like this.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    Thank you for the comments, Quenten. If the city is any good, a lot of the credit has to go to constructive critiques by some of the members over at the Cartographers Guild that helped me correct some of the mistakes I made early in the process of creating this map. It is always good to see your work through other's eyes.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    My latest update.
    The wide road running East-West is Broad Street. The wide road running SE off the intersection is High Street and heads to the palace. Melekhir is the capital of Elandia and the palace is home of the king. You can see the Old Market Square at the lower right area of this view. If you follow High Street to the west, past the intersection, you will arrive at the (New) Market Square which is approximately 800 years old. You can see part of the old city wall that still stands and serves as the western border of the wooded area around the lake. At the southern end of this run of wall is the Old Broad Street Gate. Just north of the Old Market Square is another portion of the old wall and another gate the has survived. It is known as the Old Market Gate. Most of the blue colored buildings are taverns or inns. Most the flat-roofed buildings are ones that survived the great fire that destroyed most of the city at the beginning of the reign of King Melek. At the time, the city had much more of a Middle-Eastern flavor. The canals that run through the city were constructed by King Melek to ensure water would be readily available to respond to any future fires.
      The City of Melekhir CC 9.3.png
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2018
     
    I get the sense of a very large and very detailed novel just by reading the details you mention when describing the map :)

    You really have done the layout extremely well. It looks very believable - makes a lot of sense.
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2018
     
    Very impressive, seems like it was a lot of work!
    • CommentAuthorLorelei
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2018
     
    Really nice work! I am jealous, as usual, of your talent in city mapping. Impressive!
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2018
     
    Sue,
    I have learned a great deal about the world of my novel through the maps I am making. I discovered King Melek as a result of this map. I say discovered and not created because it feels more like discovering than creation. The King didn't exist before the map, and now he plays a major part in the history of the city. On my map of Tarkas, while shading a hill, I noticed it looked a little like a gnomish face. I purposefully made it look more like a face as I continued to shade. Now I have a terrain detail my character will notice and comment on. I have discovered so much about my novel's world while mapping that I stopped the revision of book two while I map out several important cities.

    Jensen,

    Thank you for the comment. It has been a lot of work, but I am enjoying the journey. I can't imagine doing a map this large with this level of detail without CC3+.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2018
     
    Thank you for the kind remarks, Lorelei. One of the things I have done to try to produce a map that has the appearance of authenticity is look at authentic maps from the period and taking note of their details. I also view cities on Google Earth that have old sections that date to the period I am trying to replicate. I take measurements of buildings and street widths and block dimensions. This gives me some guidelines to go by when I begin to layout my city. I also take note of how buildings are clustered and try to capture this as I place structures.
    • CommentAuthorShessar
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2018
     
    Excuse me while I pick my jaw up from the floor...

    This is so stunning that anything I say will seem trite. I can't imaging the time it has taken to create this. I am awestruck...
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2018 edited
     
    Thank you, Shessar. I don't think what I have done here is beyond the ability of most people on this forum. It is about attention to detail, research, and the desire to learn and stretch your ability. There are lots of ways to make a good map and CC3 is certainly one of them.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 18th 2018
     
    Added more buildings as I work my way east on Broad Street. Redid some buildings in the area around the large pinkish building with the walled courtyard to narrow the street.
      The City of Melekhir CC 9.4C.png
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018 edited
     
    Is the amount of buildings slowing your computer down? I had this one time with much lesser buildings than on your map. Or does this depend on which houses (styleset) one is using? and of course of the power of the the PC, but mine is not too bad.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    This is obviously a labour of love - and a great city. I am fascinated about where it might stop... if it does :)

    Jensen - there are a couple of ways to cope with the slow down when working on a very large city like this. Just briefly, you can either put different districts on different sheets and hide all the sheets you aren't working on, or even better you can make use of layers the same way. If you use a different layer for each district you can still have all the buildings on one sheet, which has the added advantage that they will all share the same set of sheet effects and none of them will be casting shadows over the tops of their neighbours (which can happen if you use separate sheets).

    So if you have a city with 5 districts you could put each district on a different layer with the name of that district - including all the trees, other symbols and bits and bobs in that district, so that when you hide that district everything in that district is hidden, and not just the houses.

    Some people work with sheet effects off, which can speed up zooming and moving around a lot. It depends if you have sheet effects that you need to be able to see while you are working.
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    thanks Sue, next time I use the layer option you suggested, that sounds reasonable. Usually when I work on a map I have everything on (sheet effects, layers), because I want to see ‚whole picture‘ to make sure everything comes together nicely. But for the houses it seems I need to try new approaches.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018 edited
     
    Sue,
    Thanks for the info. I believe you solved a major dilemma for me. I was going to do the map in multiple version showing different parts of the city then paste them together. Your solution is mush better and I hadn't thought of it.

    Jensen,

    Yes, my computer feels the strain. It is more a strain on CC3+ than on the hardware.

    Just checked: 243114 entities occupying 16462.70 K of memory.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    Here is my latest installment. As I approach the wall, the spacing will open up some as can be seen on many historic maps from the 1400-1600s. I like to add small details to the map. I think they do a lot for the map as a whole. Take away the trees and footpaths in the courtyards of this map and I believe you strip away much of its character. If you look at the lake, I added small bits of beach along the waters edge in a couple of places. I try to include many of these little bits of detail that will reward the viewer who takes the time to look a bit closer.
      The City of Melekhir CC 9.5.png
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    You seem to have the city planning pretty much sorted out already.

    I like the way you are so inventive when it comes to creating specific buildings :)
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 19th 2018
     
    Some of it is copying what I see on historic sections of cities in Google Earth. The Old Port District has several clusters copied from Rothenburg, Germany. The area in the view above, along the north side of the canal, is based off Utrecht. I was having real problems doing anything that looked right until I started duplicating sections of Rothenburg. After that I got a feel for it. I have layers for different floor levels with different shadow settings. I like to stack building to create multi-storied structures
      Snip.PNG
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Added the Broad Street Market Square where more exotic and upscale goods can be found. The blue building that is on the south side of the square is one of (if not the) finest inns in the city. I have not come up with a name for it and the proprietor is open to suggestions.
      The City of Melekhir CC 9.65.png
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018 edited
     
    Really a great city map, i don‘t think I would have the patience to build such huge cities like this one or Hadrians and Quentens cities. Buildings, streets, markets, everything is well done, really fantastic.

    A name for the Inn? hmmm ... I am better in names for ugly Inn, not for expensive ones and my English is not that brilliant. Maybe something for the native speakers.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018 edited
     
    Here is a shot of the Old Port District and below it is a image from Google Earth of Rothenburg ob der Tauber. Can you identify the building clusters I copied. The copies aren't exact.
      The City of Melekhir CC 9.65 Port 10x10.png
      Rothenburg 1CR.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Here is a zoomed in shot that shows one of the statues I made and the stone wall.
      Statue and Stone wall 4.5.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Here is a PNG of the stone wall which you are welcome to use in your own maps.
      aged stone wall_HI.PNG
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018 edited
     
    All those little details are really awesome. Chapeau!
    And great that you took Rotenburg ob der Tauber, I live not so far away from this place. By the way if you are interested in seeing digital models of Bavarian medieval places you can have a check at this site from the Bavarian government. The text is in German, but you just need to scroll down and klick the videos.

    https://www.schloesser.bayern.de/deutsch/service/bayern3d/index.htm

    I really love the the digital model of the imperial castle of Nuremberg:

    https://3d.realitymaps.de/Kaiserburg/

    And of course Neuschwanstein ;)

    https://3d.realitymaps.de/Neuschwanstein/

    But maybe most interesting for you is the town of Landshut

    https://3d.realitymaps.de/Landshut/
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    I spent three years in Schwäbisch Hall. Visited Rothenburg twice and Neuschwanstein twice, also. I really miss the Deutsch food.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018 edited
     
    One technique I have picked up to construct complex, odd-shaped structures is to use the house tool with gable roof type and the shape set to 9 (trapezoid). Using these settings I can overlay houses so they are connected and the roof lines line up correctly. See image below.

    House.png

    I also used this technique to connect structures made with the house tool to make long running, direction changing wall as seen in the image below. The wall is the slim speckled orange structure running along the southern edge with the six-sided towers dispersed along its run.

    Port Tight 10.png

    The 45 degree turned sections coming off the 90 degree corners of the port facility were made by using the house tool to make the "extra" gable then re-positioning it to the outside point of the 90 degree bend.

    Hopefully these tips prove useful to you.
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    That's a killer! The roofs are rally magnificient. Tell me whenever you need Bratwurst-supply to get new energy for mapping :-)
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Will do, Jensen.

    There is actually a really good German Restaurant in the area run by a German man and his sister. The food is very authentic.
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Spectacular map. Very impressive.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Thank you, Scott.
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    So inspiring - I will wait till you have finished before attempting my next city. This is flabergasterlingly stupendifyingly magnificent
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Latest count: 264,625 entities occupying 18318.21 K memory. What is the CC3+ ceiling?

    A note on the scale of the map. I created it at 6000 x 4600 feet. After I started the map I made came to the conclusion (possibly tragically) that I needed more real estate for the city. I didn't want to start from scratch, so I double the scale by resizing my grid overlays to wind up with dimensions of 12,000 x 9200 feet. When I adjusting settings for shadows and such I just half the dimension to get the proper setting (i.e if a building is 10 feet high I would input 5 instead of 10).

    Below is a shot of the entire map area with districts and some roads labeled.
      The City of Melekhir CC 9.7 Overview2.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Here is a closeup of the latest additions. The blue building is another tavern.
      The City of Melekhir CC 9.7.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Posted By: QuentenSo inspiring - I will wait till you have finished before attempting my next city. This is flabergasterlingly stupendifyingly magnificent


    Thank you for the kind comment.
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    I cropped the overview image so hopefully the text will be large enough to read.
      The City of Melekhir CC 9.7 OVerview Cropped.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Here is a closeup of the watermill. I made the water wheel and shoot in Sketchbook and imported as a symbol.
      Mill.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 20th 2018
     
    Here is a shot of the west side of the city. You can see the Market Bridge. I made the bridge by cutting a piece out of a square guard tower form the Jonathan Robert's Cities set and pasting it together in SketchBook. Then I divided some of the stone differently and touched up the final drawing to minimize the quilting effect from a repeating pattern.

    On the west side of the bridge on the southern side is a garrison of soldiers who are part of the city watch. On the northern side is a large pinkish building which houses Elandian officials who collect tolls from the traffic on the Old Highway. After crossing the bridge into the city you arrive at the main market square sometimes referred to as the New Market. On an island in the pond to the south of the square is a statue of King Melek who rebuilt the city after a fire destroyed most of it. He built the current walls which enclose approximately one square mile of land. He reigned for close to one hundred years after inheriting the crown at the age of twelve. He was know as King Melek the Builder and the city was renamed Melekhir in his honor after his death. He was the last righteous king of Elandia.
      Westside 100dpi.png
    • CommentAuthorTexas Jake
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2018 edited
     
    Here is a closeup of the Market Place Bridge

    The Market Place Bridge.PNG

    You can see the shops along the bridge which was fairly common in the olden days.
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2018
     
    cool, reminds me of the Krämerbrücke in Erfurt. Good Idea!

    https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kr%C3%A4merbr%C3%BCcke
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2018
     
    Or the bridges in Firenze and Venetia. I also had such a bridge in Vertshusen (now in the Atlas)