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    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2018
     
    Here is the beginning of my next project - a generic Stromphe Temple, this one being that of the Temple of Poseidon on the Dockside. It will be a mixture of classical Greek and the Temple of Jerusalem as far as the internal arrangements are concerned, with an outside altar, an internal statue and temple treasury, and a 'Holy of Holies' behind the statue.
      Typical Temple.PNG
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2018
     
    Looks interesting... if a little gory :)

    What's that grid thing behind the priest?
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2018
     
    That is probably the WIP interior ground level of the temple.

    Quenten, that's the temple to the side of the Harbor Master's Office?
      Capture.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2018
     
    Yes, Jerry. It will also serve as a generic temple for all the other temples in the city except for the one on the Acropolis.
    The grid thing is for the interior - walls not really done properly yet, just a line outlining where they will go.
    Gory? What on earth makes you think sacrificing a bull on an altar would be gory?
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2018
     
    But I don't see any Maenads helping out the Priest!!
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2018
     
    It is the Temple of Poseidon, not Dionysos
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2018
     
    But they can help clean up the blood, finger licking good 😊
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2018
     
    LOL.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2018
     
    Well ok then.

    Messy!!!

    I don't think you can argue with that analysis :P
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2018 edited
     
    Something was tickling my mind, so I went and googled Poseidon and found the following in regards to sacrifice:

    "Worship of Poseidon
    Poseidon holding a trident. Corinthian plaque, 550-525 BC. From Penteskouphia.

    Poseidon was a major civic god of several cities: in Athens, he was second only to Athena in importance, while in Corinth and many cities of Magna Graecia he was the chief god of the polis.[2]

    In his benign aspect, Poseidon was seen as creating new islands and offering calm seas. When offended or ignored, he supposedly struck the ground with his trident and caused chaotic springs, earthquakes, drownings and shipwrecks. Sailors prayed to Poseidon for a safe voyage,

    sometimes drowning horses as a sacrifice;

    [citation needed] in this way, according to a fragmentary papyrus, Alexander the Great paused at the Syrian seashore before the climactic battle of Issus, and resorted to prayers, "invoking Poseidon the sea-god, for whom he ordered a four-horse chariot to be cast into the waves."[31]

    According to Pausanias, Poseidon was one of the caretakers of the oracle at Delphi before Olympian Apollo took it over. Apollo and Poseidon worked closely in many realms: in colonization, for example, Delphic Apollo provided the authorization to go out and settle, while Poseidon watched over the colonists on their way, and provided the lustral water for the foundation-sacrifice. Xenophon's Anabasis describes a group of Spartan soldiers in 400–399 BC singing to Poseidon a paean—a kind of hymn normally sung for Apollo.

    Like Dionysus, who inflamed the maenads, Poseidon also caused certain forms of mental disturbance. A Hippocratic text of ca 400 BC, On the Sacred Disease[32] says that he was blamed for certain types of epilepsy. "

    Perhaps you could replace bull and blood with pool and horse? (makes it less messy and more soggy, just for Sue!!)
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2018
     
    The above was formatted, but formatting all went away when added. :-(
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2018
     
    The blood and gore STAYS - sacrificing horses, really!!!! And pools sounds far too hygenic.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2018
     
    Oh no! I love horses. Please don't go around drowning horses! :(
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2018
     
    So, you would rather anger Great Poseidon and risk the wrath of his Earth-Shaking Trident!!! Fine, be that way (but the Harbor Master's House has really strong and deep foundations .. .. ..)
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2018
     
    Poseidon accepted bulls - it was he who sent the Minotaur to Knossos in Crete, the progeny of himself as a bull, and Pasiphae, Minos' wife, after the foolish king insulted the Earthshaker. Just accept it Jerry, I love gore.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2018
     
    Posted By: GThielThe above was formatted, but formatting all went away when added. :-(
    Don't set the post format to BBCode unless you actually use BBCode, text or html settings are more friendly to "free-form" formatting.
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2018 edited
     
    Here is the latest on the Temple with roof. Any suggestions before submission?

    And this is the description:
    This is typical of the temples in Stromphe (and indeed of all the Irisian City States, and even in Themisia to some extent) except for the great Basilica on the Acropolis.
    It consists of a 3 step pedestal, with columns surrounding the Temple atop the pedestal, along with a large outdoor altar where all sacrifices are made.
    The inside of the temple is divided into an Outer Agia (Sanctum, Holy place) and smaller Inner Agia. The Outer Agia contains the main statue of the God, and more smaller statues and treasures along right and left hand walls. As well there is often the bones of last year’s New Year (or other Holy Day) sacrifice – in the case of Poseidon, a bull, and symbols of the God on either side of the Statue – here, 2 fonts of seawater, where devotees can wash their hands and face. This is the only area of the temple which is open to the public.
    The Inner Agia is reserved for priests and on occasion, acolytes. This contains a small altar from which devotions are conducted, and a statue of the God’s sacred animal – here a golden bull. In addition, the most precious of the temple’s treasures are placed here, strongly protected against theft by magic, of course.
      Typical Temple3.PNG
      Typical Temple with roof.PNG
    • CommentAuthorJensen
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2018
     
    no comments, just: beautiful work!
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2018
     
    Oh I like the way you have taken care to make the shadow look right for an open colonnade :)

    (Since its a building and not a long corridor, its probably called something else, but I can't think of it right now)
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    Quenten's Typical Temple is now in the atlas. Enjoy.
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    That was quick
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    I'm going to have to submit more maps!!! Quenten is trying to catch up -- not going to happen :-)
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    Are you going to add the roof view too??
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    It is already there, in the FCW
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    It doesn't show up here in the atlas, or is it on a hidden sheet?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    There is a navlink in the right hand menu in the map file, "Toggle Roof".
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    Quenten was being too clever for us :P
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    Not hard, not hard 3:)