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  1.  
    Posted By: LoopysueLOL!

    Thanks LE :D

    So you are Dan Harlan? I have to confirm it - before I write it down in my little black book - the one that serves as a memory these days! :P

    You'll have to forgive me for being perpetually confused when everyone has different names in different places. I never seem to remember them! Sorry!

    And sorry also to anyone else I've called 'someone' in the last few weeks :)

    Ha! If "someone" is the worst name you can call me then I'm pretty happy.

    Yea, that's me. I used to try and keep all my "gaming" type stuff under this name, and FB was just for friends and family, but now... that's not really practical. I do try to keep the common avatar/logo, but we don't have those here.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 2nd 2018
     
    LOL!

    You can have avatar images...

    I'm just not sure how you set them up. Remy, Quenten and a couple of others have them. I think you have to have your own website or something, so that you can reference the image from here.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 2nd 2018
     
    I think I'm getting closer to getting these flying eaves right.

    There's a whole shedload of ornamentation to got on top of the roof yet.
      Buddhist 01.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeJul 2nd 2018
     
    Click on your name in any forum post - it will bring up a menu allowing you to edit your profile, including adding a picture. I don't have a website, so just added it via a pic I posted on the forum - alternatively, you could use a link to drop box etc.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2018
     
    There's still a lot of work to be done on the ornamentation - including alterations to the ends of the Dutch gable structure, where they actually curve inwards and downwards even though they are tiled. I have to do all the fantastic carvings mounted on the roof (though I may keep it really quite simple so I don't get stuck on this forever)

    I think the shading shows better with more natural colours (less contrast and saturation)
      Buddhist 012.JPG
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2018
     
    And for anyone interested in how I finally settled on creating the shading for those flying eaves, (and sorry - this is just the size that it is at the moment), here is the actual map file.

    Its not yet complete because of those rolled in eaves on the Dutch gable I've yet to manage, but the flying eaves of the lowest level are now as they will be in the final symbol.
      Buddhist 01_MAP.PNG
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2018
     
    Now that's what I was thinking when I said "wedge" shaped.
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2018 edited
     
    is the roof from the ridge line to the lowest edge a flat surface or is there a "bend" at the red line on the building on the left in the copy of your pic???
      Buddhist 0122.JPG
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 3rd 2018
     
    Hi Jerry :)

    The entire roof face below that red line is concave. If you look at the map file that is what those gradations from the outer edge towards that line are all about - gradually darker blues (blue being the colour that defines the pitch of the roof).

    I think if I modify it again I will possibly start steeper at the outside edge (start with a darker blue) and achieve the final pitch of the straight part of the roof at a lower point on the slope, so that the roof is straighter from a lower point. Doing that will also have the side effect of making the flying eaves at the corners of the building appear to be more exaggerated.

    From above (and its really difficult getting decent pictures of Japanese temples from above online) the flying eaves aren't really all that noticeable. The way we think of them being quite marked is caused by the details we see in the architecture of the structures supporting the eaves from underneath. If you look really carefully at the normal side view shots you get of these temples, though, you will see that the curve isn't really all that massive. The corners are probably only about 5 - 10 degrees off horizontal in most cases, which really isn't enough to throw shadows except at sunset and sunrise.

    However, our minds believe that the corners are curved upwards, so its necessary to create the appearance we are expecting by grossly exaggerating the curve.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2018
     
    I think this is the final version for this particular symbol. There may be a confusing mish-mash of different religions and age styles, but this is what my mind has made of all the images I've googled of the older, simpler Japanese Buddhist temples.
      Buddhist 013.JPG
    • CommentAuthorGThiel
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2018
     
    Looks really good -- feeling highly jealous!!!

    here's a link to something you might like.
    click on the second to the left small image under the big pic and it shows a 3D, spinnable model of a roman villa. https://www.turbosquid.com/3d-models/3d-max-roman-villa-rustica/607135
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2018 edited
     
    Aw Jerry. Thank you :)

    This is one of the 'special buildings' in a very large set I'm working on - all the barrel tile buildings (though strictly speaking these temples were tiled with glazed tiles that just happen to look a lot like very tidy and rather shiny barrel tiles.

    I'm going to share them in the end. It might be quite a while before I get them all finished though.

    That's a really interesting model. Thanks very much for the link! :)
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2018
     
    Your maps look like paintings, which is a good thing.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2018
     
    Thank you, Jim :)
    • CommentAuthorPeteF
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2018
     
    I just thought I'd join in and say how excellent your work is. Not only is the artwork superb but your WIP posts are really useful to others thinking of embarking on such a project. I hope the Roman style roofs come to a fruition soon as I have a project in mind that they would be perfect for. It would be great to see a way we can all share these things with each other.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 5th 2018
     
    Thank you, Pete :)

    It depends a lot on how long it will take me to do the rest of them, and I haven't limited the size of the set just yet. Maybe there will be more than one - a temples set, and then the rest.

    Now that I've figured out how to do flying eaves it shouldn't take quite as long to do other buildings to go with this latest one.

    Then I can get back to the Roman style maybe.

    I also have a slate set in mind...

    (And there are days when I wish I didn't want to do so many different things all at the same time! LOL!)
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2018
     
    This is a very crude map I made in 5 minutes flat using a further set of 6 new Japanese Temple buildings I made last night.

    There's lots wrong with it, but I'm a bit too tired to re-render it with shorter shadows right now.

    The shading on the main building is wrong, and they all need the weathering toned down quite a bit, since its interfering with the shading, but here it is
      Temple map.JPG
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018 edited
     
    How big is too big for a city building symbol?

    The reason I ask is that I've just drawn a relatively small 15th century church (its modelled on a real one just 5 minutes walk from where I live), and it's already the largest building symbol I've ever made.

    The question isn't so much about this one, but the other two that go with it - the priory and the cathedral (modelled on 11th century Christchurch Priory, and the 14th century Salisbury Cathedral - home of the actual Magna Carta). At 40 pixels per foot The symbol for this little church I've just done is nearly 5800 pixels wide. The cathedral will be somewhere in the region of 20,000 pixels wide, since it is 500 feet from end to end.

    This is too much, I think (unless someone can tell me otherwise)

    And yet... large medieval buildings like this exist in cities all over the world.

    How should I tackle this problem? Should I try to modularise a 14th century cathedral and split it into 3 segments (hoping that people will realise they can be used like lego bricks, or should I simply not bother with it?
      Church 01.JPG
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018 edited
     
    These are the cropped screen shots of the priory and the cathedral taken from Google ready for use as a blueprint pattern to draw from.
      Priory.png
      Cathedral.png
    • CommentAuthorWyvern
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018
     
    I'd go modular, Sue. That's pretty much the way these large buildings were constructed, after all. And it would make sense to do things like nave roof-ends and roof middles, so people can make the building as long as needed, plus with, say, a squared-off or rounded end wall shape as well. And a transept piece. Then the various towers/steeples/elaborate entryways/chapter houses/attached outbuildings/etc., etc., can be done as separate features, and you could do an additional series of one-sided roof pieces - again ends and middle segments - for the aisles (which would also allow use of just one aisle, not two, for example, or even double aisles).

    Look forward to seeing the gargoyles and flying buttresses add-on pack too ;D
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018
     
    Hmmm....

    All worth thinking about, even though it adds to the overall complexity of the set. I suppose that I have already made the larger Japanese Buddhist temple with a set of 6 smaller symbols...

    The only problem I can foresee with doing it that way is that there is no way of letting users know how to use the different parts, and even more importantly the internal shadows within the building between the different levels aren't going to be at all easy to replicate if you are trying to put the thing together like a lego set.

    the other option is to do away with the VH resolution version, so that there is only a HI, LO and VL version. There's a huge difference in size between VH and HI. Off the top of my head I think its a factor of 10, so the HI res version would only be 2000 pixels long (a perfectly acceptable size for what is an extremely large building)

    I'm still thinking about it.

    This is a city symbol, so I doubt gargoyles would be visible at just 40 pixels per foot - other than as vague blobs. That would be more something for a dungeon scale set
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018
     
    I've done the first draft of the priory church now, and decided this is as large as I ever want to go with a single symbol. I'm not sure if I will make a set of parts for the cathedral. I think it might be a bit too much fiddling around reassembling it each time on a map.
      Church 02.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018
     
    Note that there are no performance advantage to split a symbol into multiple parts, the only reason to do that is to let users have flexibility in their use. Loading two images will actually take more resources than loading a single large one.

    And the ratio between VH:HI:LO:VL are 50:20:5:1
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018
     
    Thanks for the info, Remy :)

    How big is the largest existing PF building symbol - roughly to the closest thousand pixels? (I don't necessarily know because I don't have all the software yet)

    I actually had a slightly different problem a couple of hours ago. I couldn't export this at the full resolution size of 40 pixels per foot because I didn't have enough memory. At least - that's the error message I got. I am inclined to believe it as well, since I only ever have 1.5 GB available, even when CC3 is the only thing I have open, and the size I first attempted to export was 13320 x 5120 (333 x 128 feet). This is only the priory church, not the cathedral.

    That was the other reason I did this one at 20 pixels per foot.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018
     
    On a more positive note, because I've done most of the work in CC3 itself (including the map file), as soon as I get a better PC I should theoretically be able to export it at the larger size - if the larger size is acceptable to everyone :)
      A.jpg
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018 edited
     
    That's a BIG sucker! Are the outer parts supposed to be lead?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2018
     
    Posted By: LoopysueHow big is the largest existing PF building symbol - roughly to the closest thousand pixels?
    Largest building is about 6k by 4k, but there is also a commercial plane, which is almost like a building, at 9k by 8k.
    • CommentAuthorpvernon
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2018 edited
     
    The largest symbol that I made was for a symbol challenge run by John Casaky (sp) using CC2. It is a locomotive round house, full 360 with a 90' turn table in the center. I think it is somewhere around 500' across. Railroad stuff is all large.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2018
     
    Yep - its fairly big, Scott. This is the lead roofing texture I made for the job, when it became apparent that most churches in this country are roofed in dirty great big panels of the stuff. Makes you wonder, really, how contaminated the ground water is around these buildings after hundreds of years of just being there.

    Remy - that makes me feel much better about the priory now. I might have a go at exporting it in two halves so that I can actually present the full resolution.

    pvernon - Wow! That's every bit as big as Salisbury Cathedral! Unfortunately, since I already have an artificial size limit imposed on me by my 1.5GB PC (not much over 10k in either direction), the largest I can export in one go is about 250 feet, which is only half the cathedral at best.
      Lead SD.PNG
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2018
     
    I thought that was probably lead, and I remember we'd talked about lead roofing on old British buildings.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2018
     
    Tons of the stuff in every town in the UK. It wasn't always so. The really old churches have tile or even stone slab rooftops. I'm not sure whether the oldest parts of Christchurch are tile or stone. It was built in 1094 on the site of an even older Saxon church.