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  1.  
    Okay, I've looked through the forum but I can't find a direct answer to what I need to know. If I choose the template that is 100 x 80.fct, does that mean my map will represent an area of 100 by 80 feet? Or the 1000 x 800? Does that mean my map will be 1000 feet across and 800 feet "high?"

    I'm sorry if this is a stupid question but I can't seem to find the answers anywhere.

    Thank you for your help!
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2018
     
    Yes. 100 feet is what you get with a 100x80.fct template.
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      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    Actually, I think it is 100x80 map units, so it could be Klingon clacks for all I know. Monsen could clear this up though.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018 edited
     
    The 1000 x 800 map template is 1000 x 800 map units.

    If it is an overland template that will represent 1000 x 800 miles. If it is either a city or dungeon map it will represent 1000 x 800 feet.

    This is only if you use the Info/distance tool to measure the distance between adjacent corners however, since if you are inclined to measure things in bananas or cars, it could (to you) be 1000 x 800 bananas or cars.

    The important thing is that a map unit can be whatever you really want it to be :)
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      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    Seems I agree with Sue, but my query is then, why have a metric system as well as old-fashioned imperial system.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    So as not to confuse the youngsters, who were never taught the difference between bananas and feet :P

    I think (and I might be wrong) the only reason the imperial system was adopted way back in the beginning is because the majority of dungeon maps started off being in feet?
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      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    Sure, I see that, but why is there a separate template for imperial and metric for nearly all the templates, if the numbers only represent map units (or bananas, as the case may be)
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    I'm right in the middle of working on Sanctuary right now, which is an imperial city map template, so I'm a bit reluctant to close it all down and make a new map just to find out, but isn't it because the distance tool is set up to measure distances in metres?

    I could be wrong ;)
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    There are also lots of other things in the template I'm using for Sanctuary that give a nod to the imperial setup, like the coordinate system, and the fill scaling. Probably more than just those two obvious ones.

    I think, if I were to try and convert it all to metric I would probably end up with quite a mess!

    Maybe that is why the templates are separate?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    As stated, all maps are in map units. The exact definition of a map unit depends on the type of map in question. For overland maps, it is miles/km, for city and dungeon maps, it is feet or meters, depending if you use a metric template or not. The difference for the metric versions are default symbol scaling, ensuring that symbols are correctly scaled (after all, you don't want that 3 foot wide door to suddenly be 3 meters on a metric map, but rather 0.9 meters as it is supposed to be)
    So, a 1000x800 overland map would be 1000 by 800 files, while a 1000x800 dungeon map would be 1000 by 800 feet.
    While map units can be technically anything, you shouldn't change the definition on the standard map types, but it is useful if you make your own template for special kind of maps (like starmaps)
    • CommentAuthortaustinoc
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    Posted By: QuentenSeems I agree with Sue, but my query is then, why have a metric system as well as old-fashioned imperial system.


    Generally speaking, you have the option to insert a map scale, which will be labeled in feet, miles, meters, kilometers, etc.
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    Hmmm... i always think of dungeon and city templates in feet, and overland in miles. I keep forgetting its in map units.

    Of course, sector maps for Cosmograpehr are in light years.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2018
     
    Posted By: JimPHmmm... i always think of dungeon and city templates in feet, and overland in miles. I keep forgetting its in map units.
    That's usually the best way to think about them. Map units crops up often enough that you need to understand the concept, but for everyday mapping, just stick to the normal units.