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    • CommentAuthorjigsawman
    • CommentTimeApr 12th 2018
     
    I am printing to Adobe PDF. here are my settings:
    Under Adobe PDF Properties
    High Quality Print
    ANSI C
    Everything else is left as default

    In the Print Drawing window:
    Active Window is selected
    All visible sheets is selected
    Fit to page
    Tiling - Horz 1, Vertical 1, Overlap % 0
    Landscape

    I click Preview and it looks like my map. I click OK to print my map and all that shows up is the outline of my landmass, the roads, the lakes and rivers. Everything else is missing. What gives?
    JSM
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2018
     
    Not really sure here, I can't seem to reproduce this myself.
    When you say 'all visible sheets' are selected, you do mean 'all visible sheets as one page' right? (as opposed to 'all visible sheets as separate pages')
    Do the same thing happen if you use another pdf printer (If you have Windows 10, I believe it comes with the microsoft pdf printer)
    • CommentAuthorjigsawman
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2018
     
    Yes, I tried is with Microsoft PDF as well. Same thing. I'll double check the "all visible sheets as one page" but I am pretty sure I have the correct one chosen.
    JSM
    • CommentAuthorjigsawman
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2018
     
    Checked my settings and everything is as it should be. I am at a loss. This really puts a dampener on getting these maps onto paper. Sigh.
    JSM
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2018
     
    I am not sure what causes your problem, but as a workaround, have you tried simply exporting it to an image instead? You can always print to pdf from your image viewer instead.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2018
     
    GIMP is free and will export any opened bitmap to pdf :)
    • CommentAuthorjigsawman
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2018
     
    The problem with exporting as an image is if the map is scaled to fit into an 8.5x11, it will export at 8.5x11. There's no way for me to print this any larger than that without loss of detail because I enlarged it. At least as far as I know.
    JSM
    • CommentAuthorjigsawman
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2018
     
    Yeah there is something funky going on. This happens to every single map I make. Preview is ok, but they just don't export correctly. Really bums me out.
    JSM
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2018
     
    Exporting as an image gives you complete control of the output size, much more than printing does. The new export options dialog even lets you specify the image using print size so you don't have to calculate the pixels yourself anymore.

    I looked a bit at the adobe settings, and discovered that the high quality print setting you are using actually defaults to 2400 pixels per inch. I think this forces CC3+ to render a larger image than it is capable of. When printing, CC3+ must still render the output. I recommend you try at standard quality print, which is still 600 dpi, which is still high enough that you would struggle to differentiate it from the high quality print in most scenarios. (Most printers use 600 dpi anyway [although you can easily get better ones though])
    • CommentAuthorjigsawman
    • CommentTimeApr 14th 2018
     
    I changed the resolution to 300 and it did not make a difference with printing. I will play with exporting then. Have never used it before. Will see how that goes. I appreciate the assistance :)
    JSM
    • CommentAuthorWyvern
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2018
     
    Given that 300 dpi is the resolution used for virtually all professional lithographic colour printing, anything beyond that is mere marketing hype (almost literally - the print quality will not noticeably improve if you use higher settings than this). There is also a limit because of the paper surface quality onto which you'll be printing, not just what your printer can (or claims it can) accomplish, of course.

    Be careful when checking what resolution is being offered though - ppi = pixels per inch and dpi = dots per inch are NOT the same things.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2018
     
    Aye - that's a really good point. You can have as many dpi as you like, but if your ppi is only 72 or 96 (96 being a common screen resolution) it will never ever look any clearer. There will just be a whole load more ink piled onto each pixel space.
    • CommentAuthorjigsawman
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2018
     
    Ok thanks : )