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    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017
     
    Hi everyone :)

    I've just discovered that the reason my laptop is performing so horribly is that its incompatible with the recent Creator's Update to Windows 10.

    This is causing so many problems for me that I'm investigating the possibility of turning to Linux.

    I've been told that PF software runs fine on WINE, but If I do go Linux, will I have to buy all my Profantasy software all over again?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017
     
    No, you won't have to buy anything again.

    Note that while it does run on Wine, it is an unsupported platform and you may run into technical hurdles not normally encountered under Windows. The main issue I've run into myself is font sizes, they are simply not the same size under Wine as under Windows, which means that mapping under Wine is just fine, but sharing an .fcw file with someone using Windows may mean that you/them doesn't see the map the way it was intended.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDogtag
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017 edited
     
    No, you'll need to install the PF stuff under Wine, which lets Windows software run under Linux.

    Edit: Too slow! This is [one reason] why I hate replying to the forum from a mobile device.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017
     
    Thank you both :)

    I was a bit slow getting back to you because my mobile device (mobile broadband) cut out for a while - part of the incompatibility issue - the OS manages things in a very weird fashion, so things keep getting shut down like they don't matter, and the prioritisation of what is more important than what is just NUTS!

    That's comforting to know - about not having to buy everything all over again. It seems that if I want to carry on using other software I may have to buy it again!

    I'm not too worried about the font size issue, since most of the time I'm sharing the exported jpeg/png files.

    Its not all of them, but apparently some HP laptops are incompatible with the Creator's Update, and mine is one of them.

    Unfortunately, Win 10 isn't clever enough to figure out that that it should never have automatically downloaded and installed an incompatible update. So much for hi-tech software!

    Uh-oh! Krita is about to autosave! Have to go - my browser shuts down when Krita autosaves!
    • CommentAuthorpool7
    • CommentTimeDec 10th 2017
     
    Other options for you to consider:
    -Install both Windows and Linux (ie. dual boot), and use Windows only for stuff you can't do in Linux
    -Install Windows under a Virtual Machine (make sure you can give it at least 4GB RAM); this may run a bit slower than native, but it should still work.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017
     
    Thanks Pool7 :)

    My machine only has 4 GB RAM, so it looks like its one or the other, and since Windows is behaving like one giant virus on my machine right now (CC3+ is functioning fine, but other apps I use just as much, like GIMP and Krita, freeze, crash, and cause other apps to shut down without warning when I use flood fills, drop shadows or blurs, which is proving to be quite stressful), I guess it has to be Linux.

    On a brighter note, I might be able to use my 20 year old copy of Corel again! :) It doesn't work with Win 10.

    When I get a better machine I might have a dual system, since I have apps like Office that I purchased for this machine, but right now and for the foreseeable future I have no money to get a better one.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017 edited
     
    I managed to boot with Linux Mint earlier this evening.

    Its waaaaaaay faster than Windows 10. GIMP is.... well its just incredible when its running in Linux - something which may interest those of you who make your own symbols ;)

    Has anyone ever tried to run Wilbur in WINE?

    (its just one of the many questions I have to answer before I make a more permanent commitment to Linux)
    • CommentAuthorBarliman
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: LoopysueI managed to boot with Linux Mint earlier this evening.

    Its waaaaaaay faster than Windows 10. GIMP is.... well its just incredible when its running in Linux - something which may interest those of you who make your own symbols ;)


    I love Mint, made my old laptop run much faster. And that reminds me I need to set my desktop up to dual boot...
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2017
     
    All the people who helped me do this over at the Guild by showing me what bits of software to get and how to install them on my memory stick so that I could try Mint... then how to adjust the BIOS settings to free myself of the Windows trap on this machine, seem to think I'm going to totally replace Windows.

    I'm not so sure. I think I need to learn how to create a dual boot system myself, since there are a few apps I have that are purely Windows, and which I would like to keep - at least for a while. I have MS Office, you see, and that's what most businesses use. Being an out of work administrator, I'd rather like to be able to work from home if I'm allowed to do that by a new employer, and I can only do that if I still have Windows and Office.
  1.  
    Don't know if you have already managed to get your Profantasy software running on Mint yet - if not my notes on an earlier thread on this forum may help. The main thing is you need to do is pick up a newer version of the Wine software than that included in the Mint distribution.

    I acquired a Windows 10 PC with the intention of using this just to run Profantasy software. I disliked it so much I returned the PC and tried again with Linux, with reasonable success. I don't know which desktop you are using with Mint, but I actually prefer the Mate variety which has the bonus of running a little faster.

    The Open Office/Libre Office software which comes with most Linux distributions will read and write most MS Office documents. There are a few features that are not compatible but all the standard functionality is provided. I have found the main thing from the MS world that can't readily be manipulated in Linux are Publisher and full Adobe Acrobat formats. (Reading PDF and Postcript files are OK it is editing the files original files that is problematic).

    I have found one or two features in GIMP can't be accessed exactly as described in the documentation in Mint. They still work, just slightly differently. This seems to be Mint specific, I think it is something to do with the way the keyboard is mapped.

    Andrew
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2017
     
    Thanks for all that info, Andrew :)

    I haven't done the partition yet. I'm still trying to work out how much of a 500GB disc to allocate to the partition.

    Perhaps not surprisingly, all my MS software still works really quite well in Windows.

    I'm still keeping most of my apps in Windows, so its only GIMP and Krita I'm really going to be using in Mint, since they really don't work at all well in Win 10 now that MS have updated it with the Creator's Update.

    All my user files will still be in the Windows partition, where I can access them from either OS ;)
  2.  
    Hi LoopySue,
    For Mint I have 60GB for the root partition containing the system files. My system is currently using about 15GB of this and I suspect you will have less software to install. You will need a Linux swap file, a maximum of about 1.5 times your RAM is a rule of thumb, although my system rarely uses it as it has a fair amount if memory. I use a separate partition for "home" to contain the user files. You can use put them as part of the root partition if you wish but it is much easier to upgrade the operating system if they are a separate partition. Allow as much user space as you can, but it doesn't sound as though you will have too much of these under Linux although graphics files for GIMP and Krita may be quite large. I currently have about 75GB of user data, mostly photos and GIS mapping data. However I do have an external disc drive for occasionally used Clip Art libraries and more mapping data.

    Good luck.

    Andrew
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2017
     
    Thanks again, Andrew :)

    I still haven't been brave enough. I think I will mull this over for a few days before I go ahead and do it.

    I have to consider how much worse Windows will perform with even less disc to use, as well as how small I can get away with having the Mint partition.

    I'm just hoping I can adjust the partitions after the installation if I make a mistake!
  3.  
    I have delayed responding as there are others far more knowledgeable on the forum. But as no one else has jumped in my experience is that you can adjust partitions "after the event" but it is only something I would ever attempt as a last resort. As far as partition size is concerned I find over about 50 per sent full there is a noticeable performance hit when there is much file updating taking place, not so much of a problem if you are just reading files, e.g. system files. So, on that basis I reckon you could go with 25GB for the Linux Mint root partition, maybe a little less. For the Home (user) partition the more the better, but given the use you have discussed you might get away with another 25-50GB but that is very limited. As you are working with graphics files which tend to be large you could put most of your images onto an external device, such as a USB 3 memory stick, and just copy them onto your hard disc when you are actively working on them.

    Don't know if that helps or just further confuses matters.
    • CommentAuthorpool7
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017
     
    Regarding partitions, and I don't want to derail this thread, Andrew is right that it's a bit risky to extend these after adding data to them, especially for regular partitions; however most (if not all) Linux distributions nowadays support LVM with Logical Volumes, Volume Groups, etc, where you can easily resize almost risk free.
    If you're new to linux, it may be an intermediate/advanced topic, but well worth reading/investigating :)
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017 edited
     
    Andy - No its not confusing at all. I think I have a problem explaining what I mean to people sometimes, but you seem to have gotten the gist of it pretty well :)

    What I want to be able to do in Mint is use GIMP and Krita to modify the associated jpg backgrounds that I commonly use in my CC3+ maps. These background files tend to be the topography and forests etc, and because of my background as an oil on canvas landscape painter I find it easier to do that part of my maps as a bitmap in one or the other of those two bitmap editors. Some would say that's cheating, but I prefer to call myself a multi-media mapper. Its also proving to be a highly successful blend of media, since I've won 4 compasses over at the Guild in the last 6 months since I started doing things that way. My most recent win was a main challenge (gold compass) for a map that was a GIMP/CC3+/GIMP sandwich - GIMP background, CC3 village map, GIMP lighting effects on top of it all.

    Back to business...

    With the setup I have in mind there wouldn't be any user files stored in the Mint partition at all - only Mint itself, and the apps I want to use in Mint. Mint already comes with GIMP as part of the 'distribution'(?), and I can download Krita as a Linux app and install it in the Mint partition ready for use.

    All the files I would be using in Mint would be created and saved in the Windows partition, using a much larger portion of the 4GB RAM than is currently accessible to me through Windows. I have been led to believe the Windows directory will be accessible from a proper Mint partition once its installed (even though I can't see the Windows system from the live boot stick I've made). Presumably things like autosaves would be saved alongside the parent file in the Windows partition, so they wouldn't clutter up the Mint partition at all.

    I suppose a simple description of the Mint partition I envisage is *not* as a storage facility, but as a far less cumbersome OS tool for running apps like GIMP and Krita, which have become nearly impossible for me to run in Windows, thanks to the incompatibility issues between Windows and my HP Pavilion laptop architecture/software, and the fact that Win 10 + Creators Update consumes 1.5 GB RAM in a totally idle state (compared to just 780 MB for Mint). Though its not even a whole GB saved, its enough to make a heck of a lot of difference!
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017 edited
     
    Pool7 - I'm learning stuff all the time, and I know it would make life a lot more simple if I could just do this right the first time and not have to mess around adjusting it at a later date.

    My theory is that if I figure it out properly before I do it so that I don't have any hazy areas in my own perception of things, then I have a much better chance of achieving that goal - hence all the pondering and questions :)

    Its good to know that I can adjust them if necessary - thanks, but I'm still aiming to get it perfect the first time I do it.

    ...

    I accidentally started something of a debate on this issue over at the Guild, and one of the latest comments on that thread has set me to being concerned about a different issue.

    Selden pointed out that HP are renowned for having... shall we say 'eccentric' ways of doing things - that they have been known to install unique graphics cards that behave quite differently to other 'run of the mill' cards and that Mint drivers may not be able to operate them properly. In a worse case scenario the Mint partition has a black screen.

    Since I only have 1 computer, and since Windows won't even be able to 'see' the new Mint partition, if that happens I've lost that part of my hard drive forever. This is perhaps the most important reason I need to do this as small as possible. I'm prepared to lose maybe 20 GB of my 500 GB hard disc if it all goes wrong, but not much more than that. I certainly don't want to lose 100GB, which is the recommended minimum, I believe. That recommendation is, however, based on user files being stored in the Mint partition... isn't it?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017
     
    Posted By: LoopysueSince I only have 1 computer, and since Windows won't even be able to 'see' the new Mint partition, if that happens I've lost that part of my hard drive forever.
    Not quite true. Windows will still see the partition, it just can't use it (as it is), but it can still reformat and reclaim it. It will only show up in the disk manager though, not in 'my computer'.

    As for knowing if things work, don't they have a live version you can run from an USB? It is way slower than having it installed, but it lets you test the basic capabilites. I haven't used Mint myself (I am more of a CentOS guy, but then again, I am more concerned about the server side rather than the desktop side), but a lot of distros have live versions, either as a separate download, or part of their regular installer. This is a good way to test that everything works before doing anything to your computer. And if it works with the live version, it should work just as well with the installed version.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017 edited
     
    Remy :)

    OMG! ROTFL!

    How silly of me! Of course the drivers are ok! How could I have tested it otherwise? Honestly!!! *tuts at own stupidity*

    Yes, I have already made a live boot stick by following the links and instructions that Redrobes gave me in this comment

    (I had to mess around with the BIOS settings, but the following comments in that thread describe the process, including the mistakes I made and how they were corrected)

    One of the demo apps in Mint live boot is GIMP, and it works like grease lightning - INFINITELY better than it has ever worked in Windows 10 - even before the Creators Update wrecked everything for me. Having experienced it I can't believe how much treacle I have to wade through when I'm using it in Win 10.

    The live boot stick generates a desktop that has on it an installation app that will, if I use it, create the partition on my hard drive. Its just the notes that follow step 5 of the instructions that have got me all confused. And being confused I've ground to a halt.

    However, now that you have pointed out the obvious proof that the graphics card drivers in Mint work perfectly well with my laptop's graphics card, this one little step in the installation procedure is the only thing that's holding me back - not knowing what numbers to put in all those little boxes there in the notes about doing a 'Something else' installation.
  4.  
    Hi Loopysue,
    I claim no great expertise and am a bit of a Luddite as far as technology is concerned. I like the easiest solution that will achieve my needs. But maybe these observations will help.
    As I understand it what you intend is
    1/ To switch between Windows and Linux by rebooting, not run one of the operating systems in a virtual machine of the other
    2/ As far as possible keep all your user data in the Windows partition.

    My Mint operating systems uses about 10GB. I have more software installed than you intend but don't have Krita installed.
    My user data occupies about 75 GB of data and growing but includes photos, GIS data etc.
    You will need some user data under Linux (under Home/User name) even if you don't save any application data files there. This includes your user profile and software configuration settings for your user. I think it may also contain temporary working files generated as you use applications.

    You will need a swap file. As the Mint documentation suggests space equal to your RAM is about right. You shouldn't need more than 1.5 times the RAM.
    The default for the Mint partitioning is to include user data ( "Home") as part of the root (/) partition. You might want to consider a separate partition for user data as this means you can reinstall Mint or perform major system upgrades without overwriting the user data, although it is still good idea to back it up before you do ! A separate partition doesn't use that much more space.

    Based on that I imagine something like 50GB in total would be enough. I would avoid going lower than, say, 30GB

    If you want to print and scan direct from Linux you will also need to do a little of tweaking, particularly if you run a firewall on your PC, but again my experience is that it is fairly straightforward.

    I don't know how effectively Mint accesses data on a Windows 10 partition. Last time I did this sharing dual booting to any extent was with XP, shortly before I totally abandoned Windows for personal use. As far as I know this will work but I don't know how much of a performance overhead there is so you might find it is better to make a temporary copy of the data from Windows to Mint to work on it then copy it back when you have done. In general autosave will be made to the same directory as the parent file.

    On an entirely irrelevant note. I have found Mint one of most hardware friendly distributions. I haven't had any hardware compatibility problems with my HP 8560W laptop , although it does have a separate NVidia graphics card not an embedded graphics chip.

    Good luck.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017 edited
     
    Thank you for those thoughts, Andrew. I'm getting closer and closer to doing this. Every little piece of information counts ;)

    I have no idea if this is the right thing, but I have an "Intel(R) HD Graphics 4000". Is that the 'graphics card'

    And... GIMP's performance was just out of this world on the live boot of MINT
  5.  
    Yes, that is the graphics chipset. And you already knows that works because it runs from the usb version.

    Since I would expect an installed version of Mint to run faster than a live boot version on a usb stick GIMP must be really dire under Windows 10. :-0
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017 edited
     
    Dire isn't the word for it. In comparison to the thoroughbred racehorse way it works in Mint, in Win 10 GIMP is like a small and very tired little donkey carrying a burden its own weight on its back up a very steep slope!

    So you can understand my enthusiasm for getting Mint installed :P
    • CommentAuthorjslayton
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017
     
    One reason that Linux distributions of graphics programs can run much faster than the corresponding Windows version comes down to the OpenGL graphics versions. The default Windows OpenGL graphics drivers tend to be poor at best. Vendors of discrete graphics hardware like Nvidia and AMD (to some extent) tend to provide good OpenGL drivers for their Windows hardware, but Intel has notoriously poor and limited Windows OpenGL drivers, especially if your hardware is more than a couple of years old. That's unfortunate because typically only very high-end laptops have discrete graphics and are stuck with Intel solutions.

    There is a project called Mesa3D that is an OpenGL work-alike (it can't be called OpenGL for legal reasons). It has reasonable performance on most graphics hardware, even on older Intel graphics. It also supports features for OpenGL versions that the vendor's own driver may not support. The Mesa3D project has been included by default on most Linux distributions that I've tried, but is carefully lacking on any Windows distribution. You can download it and it may make things work faster on your Windows machines, but very few users bother (or even know about it).

    I was reading a commentary about games using the Unity game engine last week (it may have been an older discussion) and the important observation that was gleaned from an analysis of their user telemetry is that most user don't update their device drivers. Ever. What they're using is what shipped with the machine. That's unfortunate because what ships with the machine is often an early and unoptimized software build. At the very least, it's been optimized to be able to work, not to be fast. As time goes on. most vendors have at least one or two driver updates that fix bugs and may improve performance.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017
     
    That's really useful information. Thank you Joe :)

    Once I've sorted out this Mint partition (which I'm hoping to do tonight or tomorrow morning), and if the apps I'm keeping in the Win 10 partition are still too sluggish to be worth using (which actually doesn't include CC3+, which is working splendidly without a care in the world), I'll have a look at the drivers ;)
    • CommentAuthorjslayton
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2017
     
    As an aside, one reason that you might observe programs like Krita and The GIMP slow down while CC3+ doesn't is that CC3+ is already using software rendering and so it can't get any slower.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2017 edited
     
    I didn't know that.

    CC3+ has been the most stable of my graphics apps since the Fall Creators Update. At least it doesn't crash or groan for half an hour before doing it, unlike GIMP and Krita.

    I'm currently looking at a more simple way of installing Mint 'alongside' Windows 10.

    See the video here in these instructions

    Ideal for PC idiots like me :)

    I've already created the live boot memory stick, so I only have to do the installation bit. I just didn't know how big to make the new partition. This video shows how the simpler installation method defaults to the minimum size required to run Mint 18.3, which is a whole lot smaller than the recommended 100GB given by the other more complicated method.

    There's also a tool that opens up as soon as you boot into Mint for the first time, which detects out of date drivers and locates the current version, so I'm hoping to be even more impressed by GIMP once I've installed Mint and its working with the proper drivers for everything.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2017
     
    After a lot of faffing around with the boot system I now officially have a partitioned dual boot laptop - Win 10 and Linux Mint.

    Wouldn't recommend doing it yourself unless you've already done something like this before. I only managed to do it with a lot of guidance from other people - not least the guidance here in this thread.

    Thank you for all your help - it is much appreciated :D
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2017
     
    Reviving this thread to ask if anyone has previous experience/success in attempting to run CC3+ on Linux, using Wine, or Playonlinux (a sort of front end app to Wine).

    When attempting to open the old installation on my Windows drive from the Linux partition using Wine, most of the drivers won't run.

    I have a list as long as 2 diary pages of all the affected drivers.

    When I try to install CC3+ in a Playonlinux folder I get an error message saying something about CC+ for Windows not being found and suggesting that I use Windows installer to install the software.

    I guess that means that as far as running CC3+ on linux goes, unless someone has already successfully done it, then it can't be done?

    All other discussions where people speak of successfully running CC3+ on Wine, they are using a Mac, not an ordinary PC with a Linux OS.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2017 edited
     
    I've never used Playonlinux, but the last time I tried to install it under Wine, it was just a matter of starting the installer and running it, just like on windows. These are my Wine test results from August 2017. That was done on Fedora Linux though, I've never tried Mint. I don't remember which version of the CC3+ installer I used back then, but most probably it was the 3.77 one (the current full installer).

    I don't run CC3+ on Linux regularly though, I only do some tests for the Wine AppDB every now and then.
  6.  
    Hi LoopySue,
    It can definitely be done on Mint 18.2 using Wine on my HP Elitebook. If you search this forum for Linux you should find an earlier thread with an attachment describing how I did this, which may help. I don't know if this approach will also works with Mint 18.3.

    I reorganised my filestore and removed all the Profantasy software a while back as I am not doing anything that requires it at the moment. Maybe now is the time to upgrade my main PC to Mint 18.3 and try to reinstall CC3+ etc.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2017
     
    Thank you, both :)

    I will have a look for that thread. Currently accidentally logged onto Win 10 instead of Linux and trying to do everything at lightning speed. Something is automatically downloading, and has already eaten a good chunk of my BB allowance.

    Another Win 10 update - despite having done everything to disable them! Aaaaaargh :(

    This is why I want to go entirely Linux. I just need to work out how to install everything I need there first before I get rid of this wretched MS.... VIRUS!

    Have to go.

    Be back in a few minutes on Linux to do the search....
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2017 edited
     
    I think I've found the problem here.

    Mint Version 18.3 isn't listed as being supported by the latest version of Wine (Crossover), which is what comes with the Mint package (its one of the extra apps you can choose to install from the Mint software manager)

    I will just have to carry on using CC3+ in Windows with the broadband switched off until they update Wine sufficiently to catch up with Linux developments. Mint is relatively new, after all.

    (sorry about the oversized screen shot. I'm still getting used to how things work in Linux. CTRL+PRT SC doesn't work! LOL!)

    It doesn't matter how many times I try to follow any of the instructions, I just get the same old thing with the majority of CC3+ .dll files not being installed or loaded.
      Screenshot-2017-12-29 WineHQ - Wine Binary Downloads.png
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2017
     
    No worries.

    At least I have a dual boot system. I just have to remember to disable my broadband before logging into my Windows partition to use CC3+

    And at least when I log into Mint I can still access all the exported jpg and png files I created in CC3+ while I was working in Win 10 :)
  7.  
    Hi LoopySue,

    I had the same problem with Mint 18.2. The version of Wine picked up by the Mint software manager from the default repository is quite old. However by following the instructions from the Wine website I was able to newer versions and then install CC3+ etc.

    I don't know if you saw my attached notes from an earlier thread, or if they will help (Apologies for the duplication if you have already seen these.)

    If I have a chance will try to install on my test laptop, which is running Mint 18.3, over the next few days and let you know how I get on, might be a bit of delay though as there are some other jobs higher up the list.

    Best wishes,

    Andrew
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2017
     
    Print screen typically saves to a holding location in memory.

    Open a graphic program like gimp or Irfanview, paste, and it will show up.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2017
     
    Thanks Andrew :)

    I had already found that, but no need to apologise!

    It may be a couple of days before I get around to trying again. All this trying and failing is a bit tiring, and its not as if I haven't got a way of using CC3+ anyway.

    Jim - maybe its because I pressed CTRL as well as PRT SC? Whatever, It didn't work. I had to right click the page and pick 'take screenshot' in Firefox, which is a very peculiar way of doing things, for me. It generates a temporary new web page and you have to download and save the image if you want to keep it.

    Very odd indeed!
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2017
     
    Yes, that is odd as I have, but not a recent version, used the method I mentioned above to prt scn in linux.
  8.  
    The Print Screen functionality will depend on how the Linux installation process has detected and set up the keyboard. It will have made a "best guess" unless you manually selected a keyboard to override this during the installation. This can be particularly problematic for laptops which often have non-standard keyboard layouts. On one of my laptops the print screen call is linked to the "function" key. Try looking at the keyboard settings in the system configuration to see what shortcut has been allocated, if any. You can change this to whatever you want. I can't give you chapter and verse instructions for the Cinnamon desktop as it differs somewhat to the Mate desktop I am using. You can also install various additional applications which give enhanced screen capture facilities.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2017
     
    LOL! You've no idea of the very strange things that have happened, other than the expected outcome for some of the more common shortcut key combinations :P

    CTRL+ALT+DEL, for instance brings up the log out/shut down option (I pressed it the other day when something froze on me, and I forgot I was in Linux). Hastily cancelled!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2017
     
    I just did a test install of the latest Linux mint, and with the current stable version of Wine installed (2.0.3), CC3+ installs and runs perfectly fine. The only manual intervention I had to to was that the shortcut put on the desktop didn't seem to work at all, so I had to use the file browser to browse to the location of fcw32.exe and launch it from there. This was due to wine not automatically adding itself to my path, and could be fixed either by editing your path to contain the wine install directory, or edit the shortcut to use the full path to wine.

    Addons and updates also installs fine, no error messages or anything.

    This was done under the current stable release of wine, and no additional stuff like winetricks or playonlinux, just plain vanilla wine.
    I did not test under the version of wine in mint's default package manager, as that was so old it starts reflecting badly on the mint distribution including that stuff.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2017
     
    Well I've done something wrong to it then. I tried to uninstall the old version of Wine and I couldn't seem to get rid of it. That means I can't install the new version, since the webpage stresses that its best to completely remove any older versions before installing the new one.

    When I'm a bit more au fait with Linux I may delete this partition and reinstall Mint, but this time I won't download and install the Wine package that comes with it, so that I can use the new version instead.

    I'm hoping to upgrade the memory to 8GB RAM in the next month, so I will leave sorting this out till after that's been done.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2017 edited
     
    You should be able to find which wine packages you have installed by running the command
    apt list --installed | grep wine

    then, you can use
    sudo apt-get remove packagename
    to remove the packages.

    my commands to install wine was
    wget https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/Release.key
    sudo apt-key add Release.key
    sudo apt-add-repository 'https://dl.winehq.org/wine-builds/ubuntu/'
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install wine-stable



    Note that this did not add wine to my path, so I recommend adding /opt/wine-stable/bin to your path

    Then I simply right click on the installer, and did open with -> Other application. I typed the path to wine (you can also browse for it) in the text field at the bottom, and then hit the 'Set as default' button before hitting ok (Setting it as default means all windows .exe files would be opened with wine, which is reasonable.
    On first time run of wine, it will say it is missing some components, simply say yes and it will fetch and install them for you. CC3+ installer will then start and run as normal.

    Since we set wine as the default, in the future you can just double click on exe files to start them, such as the update and add-on installers.


    Note that the icon to launch CC3+ wine placed in your start menu and desktop will only work if you added wine to your path as I mentioned above. If you didn't do this, you will need to edit the shortcut and change the wine command to /opt/wine-stable/bin/wine instead to enable the shortcut to actually find the wine executable itself, but that is really a wine issue, not A CC3 one.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2017
     
    Thank you for this, Remy :)

    I still need to absorb some kind of 'system image' into my mind (learn a heck of a lot more than I have already) before I am confident enough to do all that super user stuff with the command lines.

    I've only used 2 sudo commands to date, and they have been one-liners that other Linux users have given me to get me out of a mess each time.

    As they say - a little knowledge is a dangerous thing!

    I will eventually do this, but for now I am just trying to understand all the different layers and how things actually work in Linux ;)

    What having Windows all these years has done to me is slowly robbed me of the ability to be in command of the situation.

    If you take away too much of the control a child has over a situation, the child will grow up weak and utterly dependent on you - and that's what they've done to all us Windows users since 3.1. Even XP was an overprotective parent. Having Win 10 is equivalent to unwittingly choosing to live in a dictatorship, rather than in a free democratic state.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2017 edited
     
    Never be scared of the command line. It is your best tool no matter if you work in Windows, Linux or MacOS. On all three systems it is literally the difference between being locked in to do things exactly as the OS manufacturer wants you to have it versus having control yourself. Of course, never type anything into the command line either without knowing what the command does, always research each command first, especially commands provided to you by others.

    This is one of the reasons I love CC so much, it has a command line :)
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2017
     
    That was one of the things that surprised me about CC3 when I first bought it.

    Because of the Windows conditioning I've had for the last 30 years, though, I was (and still am) partly afraid to use it. If there's a button that does the same thing, then I use it rather than the command.

    You all seem so very 'streetwise' about using commands that its very hard to describe the difficulties I have, though I am sure I am not the only person of average intellect you have ever met who is scared of the command line thing! LOL!

    I think it should be recognised as a mental aberration, and given a nice easy-to-understand label, like 'Windows Disorder'.

    Windows Disorder is a serious disability and requires patience to treat successfully. Thankfully there are lots of people here who seem to understand the problem and are willing to help in the small doses required so as not to frighten the patient in to total withdrawal - like you :)

    Thank you, Remy :D
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: LoopysueBecause of the Windows conditioning I've had for the last 30 years, though, I was (and still am) partly afraid to use it. If there's a button that does the same thing, then I use it rather than the command.

    You all seem so very 'streetwise' about using commands that its very hard to describe the difficulties I have, though I am sure I am not the only person of average intellect you have ever met who is scared of the command line thing! LOL!
    You're not. That's part of the evolving nature of computers and operating systems. From being a very technical thing for technical users, it has turned into something everyone uses every day, and as such, things needed to be both simplified, and made easier to use, and more difficult to break (Often to the annoyance of more technical users like me, and that typically applies to Windows and Linux alike). This is very visible in the evolution of both Windows and Linux. Today, many linux distros also make a point of hiding away their command line as best as they can, while Microsoft actually went the other way with Windows 10, making the powershell command line more easily accessible and at your fingertips in every explorer window.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2017
     
    Microsoft cooked their goose when they rendered my 3 year old laptop useless to me.

    Linux saved me. I would have dropped out of the online scene altogether without Mint.

    I rarely bother to log onto the Windows partition any more. Worse - if I DO log onto my Windows partition the first thing that happens is it starts to automatically download something big that I can't stop it from downloading - presumably the next 3GB bombshell.

    Quite apart from the fact that these updates have cost me a staggering £120 so far in over the limit broadband consumption, each time I get another one come in it only ever makes everything about ten times worse than before.

    I think the new Linux habit of hiding the command line may be due to the fact that it scares the hell out of all us defecting EX Windows users ;)

    They don't exactly hide it though. Its right there on the tray at the bottom of my screen whenever I feel brave enough to open it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeDec 31st 2017 edited
     
    No, I was surprised at how visible it was in Mint compared to a few other distros I've been testing over the last few years. This is probably one of the very big advantages in the Linux world, you can get the distro you prefer. It is still Linux at the core, but there are quite a few differences between the distros, some small, some big. With Windows and Mac, you only have the one choice. Of course, with all the distros to pick from, it is also easy for a beginner to get confused over what the best option to pick is.


    CC3+ was very well behaved on Mint too, btw. With the exception of the font issue I mentioned earlier, I couldn't really tell the difference from working under Windows for the most part, so I think you will have a good experience once you get the latest version of Wine working. Of course, I only did some surface testing and capability testing on some more specific points, so there might be things I didn't discover, but it seemed like every important feature worked as they should.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 31st 2017
     
    LOL!

    I'm laughing at my situation - being stuck with an out of date Wine layer right now because of my own cowardice, even though you've just told me how to do it in line by line instructions.

    I'm getting closer to sorting it out day by day, though ;)