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    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 4th 2017 edited
     
    So I've just picked up a big project that is Asian themed, and my one quandary is how to create those curving, pointed roofs used on pagodas and shrines? I am at a loss. Any suggestions? Anyone have any experience with something like that? (Stock photo included purely as an example). I would appreciate any suggestions or tips and tricks anyone might have to accomplish what I need to do. (It will be seen from above, of course, so the curve wouldn't have to be as pronounced/obvious as the side view, but I still want to be able to indicate it somehow).
      pagoda.jpg
  1.  
    Jochaim has a tutorial on how to make curved bevels using the blend overlay effect. it's linked on the Mayana Island show and tell thread. Perhaps something in that tutorial can give you your direction :D
  2.  
    For some ideas jump on Google Earth Pro (it's free) and look up famous shrines/temples with pagodas. These give some interesting overhead views. Try Kofukuji, or even just type in "pagoda" and see what pops up. The entire city around Tahoto Pagoda is pretty interesting.
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017
     
    Finding overhead views isn't an issue. I just used the picture above as it shows off the curve better than an overhead view.

    I haven't tried the blend overlay effect yet. It might do what I'm looking for.

    I have to find better dragon statues for roof decorations, too. I've gotten this far, and its okay, but I'm not overly happy with it. This little pagoda is just a portion of a larger map, but I still want to get it right.
      pagoda.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017 edited
     
    Scott, here are some pagoda diagrams I have. They may (or may not) be useful
      Pagoda 1.png
      pagoda.png
      Pagoda X-section.jpg
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2017
     
    I have that middle one, but that bottom one is great! Thanks, Quenten!
    • CommentAuthorPale Horse
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2017
     
    Oh wow, those carvings really add to the the map's atmosphere!

    I do think the proportions of each story are a bit steep; pagodas tend to have a broad top roof and not as much widening as it goes down (a result of RPG proportions?). Adding something to represent the hoju and suien would be great, too.

    I really had to keep scrolling back up to check out those carvings and how they add so much.
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2017 edited
     
    Pale Horse, you obviously know this stuff. I don't, so any suggestions are appreciated.
    • CommentAuthorLorelei
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2017
     
    Great job coming up with an alternative! I really like what you did with the statues!
    • CommentAuthorShessar
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2017 edited
     
    This may give you something to try. I can answer any questions if this is the way you want to go with it.
      Image1.jpg
      Image2.jpg
      Image3.jpg
      Image4.jpg
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017
     
    Oh, yes, Shessar, this may work. Did you just draw curved polygons and fill them with roof fill or did you use some other commands?
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017 edited
     
    That looks like a shaded polygon arrangement to me - draw one, turn it in to a shaded polygon, and do a circular array of 4 at 90 degrees ;)

    I guess you also have a dark inner glow on that sheet.

    Nice work Shessar!
    • CommentAuthorShessar
    • CommentTimeDec 14th 2017 edited
     
    Thanks Sue!

    @Scott
    I drew the poly using lines and a curved path. Exploded all. Then lint to path to turn it into a poly with fill set to the desired roof fill.
    Mirror copy to make the squared shape.
    I turned the left and right into shaded polys, leaving top and bottom as is.
    Black inside glow to add more depth.

    There may be more efficient ways of doing it (see sue's post). This was just the steps I took as I experimented.

    Hope this makes sense. :)
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 22nd 2017
     
    Thank you, Shessar! I did exactly as you suggested and it worked a charm! And I used a couple commands I never use, so it was a learning experience, as well.
      pagoda2.JPG
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeDec 22nd 2017
     
    Yay, this is great. A great example of how this forum really works in helping develop techniques.
    • CommentAuthorTonnichiwa
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2017
     
    wow, this is really well done! I love it!
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2017
     
    Good going, Scott :)

    I might be reading this wrong, but the steps up to the base of the temple seem to be standing above it and on top of it. Maybe its the shadows?
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 23rd 2017
     
    No, I have to adjust the stairs. The base was cut out for them but once I added the bevel effect it didn't look right, so I have to pull the stairs out a bit. I've been more concerned with the roof! Now that I have that tackled I can tidy up a few other things.
    • CommentAuthorPale Horse
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2017
     
    Looks great! The curve really works, and it's nice you added a little something in the center at the top of the structure.
    • CommentAuthorLorelei
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2017
     
    Wow! This is GREAT! Excellent teamwork...I love this forum. Shessar, you are a genius. Scott, great job adapting....I can't wait to see your finished map!
    • CommentAuthorShessar
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2017
     
    I'm glad this worked out for you Scott and it is always good to learn new techniques. I've learned soooo much myself just from reading the forums here. Great forum with great people.

    Nice work on the building too. I think it portrays exactly what you were shooting for. Wonderful!
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    There is a story behind this little pagoda. This might get lengthy, so feel free to skip it if you so choose...

    As some may know, my younger brother Steve suddenly and unexpectedly passed away in mid-October. We were two completely different people with different interests, different circles of friends, different lifestyles, and career paths, etc. The one interest we shared was gaming and played RPGs together with friends since out teens (MANY years ago!!!). As careers and families evolved we gamed less until we stopped altogether. Then about a year ago, Steve's wife volunteered me to teach her nephews how to play D&D5E (I guess because I've worked in the game design business for over 30 years). In any event, we were gaming together again with a new generation, and it was wonderful. Our original group played the same characters for many years so when I started our new campaign I used the same world but generations in the future where the exploits of our old characters impacted the world of these new, young characters. I had a whole over-arching storyline I was working on. But then we lost Steve in the autumn and everything sort of ended or is at least on hold for now.

    Anyway, I told Steve's wife that the only things I'd like to have were his dice and his folder of characters and notes. That would be the perfect remembrance for me. I was at their house on Halloween, and as I was leaving Steve's wife handed me a large plastic bag. Steve's little dice bag and his character folder were in there, along with a long white plastic bag. It turned out that the long bag contained a rolled up poster of a giant sheet of graph paper that had been professionally laminated. On the paper, in 3" measures, was my brother's long-played character's monastery (he played a monk), all detailed out to the last tree, statue, etc. in pencil and marker. Both sides. One side was the ground floor and grounds of the place complete with gardens, ponds, secret passages, and the little pagoda, and the reverse side was the basement, second floor, and attic. Every room detailed and labeled! I had never seen this and did not know it even existed. I have no guess as to how long it took him to measure and draw everything out or when he did it. The laminate is yellowed and the pencil on the graph paper is faded, so it must have been many years ago. Corny as it sounds, I feel as though I have found my own treasure.

    So I have been painstakingly recreating what Steve drew out on that graph paper. Carefully counting 3" squares and exactly duplicating what he did to stay 100% faithful to his vision. Nothing changed, nothing left out. I have added some additional details, but nothing that changed anything he did. It has been a labor of love, and I work until my eyes ache too much from counting the little graph paper squares and work to make out the fading pencil lines.

    So here's where I am so far. It been many, many hours of hork, and there's many more to go. But so far I'm very happy with it.
      Order of Sensoo Lung.JPG
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    And here's a picture of the original laminated graph paper poster.
      IMG_4368.JPG
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      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    This is wonderful, and the story/rationale is just so beautiful. Bless you.
    •  
      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    This is wonderful, and the story/rationale is just so beautiful. Bless you.
    • CommentAuthorTonnichiwa
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    Wow, that's really well done!
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    That is so lovely - such a lovely thing to do.

    Maybe you should show his wife and his kids, so they can see the world he created lives on?
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 26th 2017
     
    Thanks. His wife has no interest in gaming, and never joined us (we played at their house). Don't know as his daughter would be interested, either, but I do intend to show them both when I'm done. Actually, this whole thing is going into a book I'm writing (a new fantasy setting), so it will live on and be enjoyed by others.

    At this level, a lot of details are lost, but its pretty intricate (there are koi in the pond swimming at different depths, sliding doors on most of the rooms, etc.). One thing that I am debating is whether to put the furnishings in each room or just label them?
    • CommentAuthorWyvern
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2017
     
    One of the many joys of RPGs that rarely features in any of the rulebooks or supplements - the fact any part of the world can become as real and detailed as you wish to make it. And your rendition is a real delight, Scott.

    Personally, and based on the numerous setting plans I've created for myself down the decades in similar fashions (i.e. from hand-drawn on graph paper through to CC3+ versions), I'd be inclined to add as much furnished detail as seems appropriate to each room, and label it as well (if typically with just a letter or number keyed to a separate list, or more usually a full description). But that's just me, of course ;D
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2017
     
    Thanks, Wyvern. I really can't take the credit, though, as to be honest I'm not overly familiar with Asian buildings and settings. That was my brother's thing. I'm just the humble hand drawn-to-CC3+ interpreter on this one.

    And I think I probably will add the furnishings. Again, this might be a bit tricky as CC3+ doesn't have many Asian symbols, and some things just aren't the same, but I'll do the best I can (I'm notoriously OCDish about details and correctness).
    • CommentAuthorLorelei
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2017
     
    Oh wow, Scott, what a wonderful, poignant tribute to your brother and the love of the game you shared with him. I am really moved by this story. And....the map is just beautiful! What you've done with the gardens is just wonderful and of course, the pagoda. I cannot wait to see it completed! I LOVE that you have the map your brother made up so long ago and you're right...it IS your very own found treasure.
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2017
     
    Thanks, Lorelei. Its a labor of love. As with all my mapping projects, I'm letting it sit and simmer now for a bit before going in and cleaning up and finishing the first floor and grounds, and then I start the other floors...! When I'm through I think I'll have Steve's original framed and hang it in my office.
    • CommentAuthorLoopysue
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2017
     
    Frame both of them as a pair?