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    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017
     
    I'm working on an antique-style map and need to put in rhumb lines. Is there anything in CC3+ or any of the annuals that will produce rhumb lines for me, or will I have to try to put them in manually? I recently added all of the annuals to my program, so I have everything but am still working through them and am not fully familiar with what each offers yet. Thanks for the help, as always!
    • CommentAuthorJimP
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017
     
    Some of the Annuals haven't been updated to work with CC3+ yet. Each Annual has a CC3+ specific installer to download and run as administrator on your home computer.

    I'm not familiar with Rhumb lines.
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      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017
     
    As far as I know, no. I haven't really used rhumb lines myself, but as far as I understand them, they are rather projection-specific, while CC3+ doesn't really about projections at all.
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      CommentAuthorDogtag
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017 edited
     
    That said, if you want to add windrose lines, like you'd find on portolan charts (and which often use the name "rhumb line" in a more general, if imprecise, sense), then you may find windrose symbols in various "cartouche" or "coast" symbol catalogs (those are two separate catalog types).

    See p. 56 of the CC3+ User's Manual (p.44 in the CC3 User's Manual) or the online help topic for "Trim to entity" for an explanation of how to add windrose networks quickly and easily. You can also adapt the method discussed there to lines you draw yourself (or arcs if you want to add true rhumb lines), rather than symbols.

    I hope that helps.

    Cheers,
    ~Dogtag
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      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017 edited
     
    Can someone give me an example of these windrose or Rhmb lines? Are they what we call navigation lines? Sorry to show utter ignorance here. Looked it up on Wikipedia, and still doesn't make much sense to me.
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017
     
    I have CC3 and CC3+ with all annuals installed in one or the other or both, depending upon which they are compatible with.

    Perhaps I used the wrong term. Navigation lines is maybe a better name. Windrose lines might be the same thing? Usually seen on antique maps radiating from a cartouche in all directions and that stop when they meet a land mass. That's the critter I'm looking for. I'm not looking for a full-scale webbing of lines, which perhaps rhumb lines actually are?

    Like what's on this map:
      f1ca9af454aaf55a1c477cc9946aae62.jpg
    •  
      CommentAuthorMonsen
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017
     
    Posted By: QuentenCan someone give me an example of these windrose or Rhmb lines?
    A rhumb line is a kind of navigational line, but it is not the same as these "nav line roses" we often adds to maps. They're designed to make for easier navigation than great circle routes (which are the optimal route, but more difficult to follow from a navigational standpoint), but still represent a good course. The problem with these is that their representation really depends on map projections, and they are usually not straight lines (They are straight on the Mercator projection though)

    Posted By: ScottAPerhaps I used the wrong term.
    Yea, those are not actually Rhumb lines. Well, not in modern speech anyway. For those kinds of navigation lines, check the pages Dogtag referenced from the manual.
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      CommentAuthorQuenten
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017 edited
     
    You can make your own nav lines using straight lines and the Trim function - just make the line width more than 0.0, since it won't be seen well on printing or as an export to a png or jpg - Monsen alerted me to this on my own map of Helmonte in the Community atlas. No need for special symbols at all - and you can apply whatever effects you like on them as well.
      Helmonte small.JPG
    • CommentAuthorScottA
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2017
     
    Okay, thanks. That's what I'm looking for, then!
    • CommentAuthorJay_NOLA
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2017
     
    Annual 1 which doesn't have a CC3+ version yet had some nav line stuff in it f you don't want to use the trim function.

    http://www.profantasy.com/annual/2007/april07.html

    When I heard rhumb lines I got thinking of the Hornblower movie The Fire Ship (The Examination for Lieutenant - UK release title) as rhumb lines was as I recall was what was being asked during the examinations when Hornblower and others are asking about about what the examiners are asking.