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    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2012
     
    This came out better than I thought. The font is Neverwinter Nights (which is appropriate).
      Avern_FR Style small.jpg
    •  
      CommentAuthorRalf
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2012
     
    Wonderful to see this style in action. The rivers might need a little work, they could look a little more natural. The question comes to mind, why does the NE river end somewhere in the middle of nowhere?
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2012
     
    I always have trouble with rivers. This is a variation of another map I did by the same name, and yes the river ends abruptly. I may have it feed into marshlands, which would make sense geographically (I think).
  1.  
    Posted By: RalfWonderful to see this style in action. The rivers might need a little work, they could look a little more natural. The question comes to mind, why does the NE river end somewhere in the middle of nowhere?


    Ralf, I can see where that looks goofy to you, and naturally it seems odd - BUT - it's NOT an error - or an unprecedented representation of a logical and workable river system.
    Below is a map of the major river systems of the United States that I aquired from the internet - and is useable here under United States copyright allowances for the purposes of academic examination and analysis. I have taken the liberty of highlighting "isolated waterway systems" to demonstrate that rivers can take any number of kooky, offbeat pathways that you can imagine. They don't have to originate - or end along major tributaries that lead to oceans, lakes, or seas. They can literally pop up out of nowhere - and terminate anywhere.

    It didn't make much sense to me either - until I started mole surfing for info - and - sure enough - believe it or not - it's a sound design concept. You can even have isolated rivers within a few miles (or kilometers) of each other that flow in opposite directions! There actually seems to be no set rules at all governing the placement of rivers and streams in the real world. Weird but true.

    One thing that "could" be suggested though - is that a few more minor stream and riverlet branches could be added to a few more of the major rivers, and that the paths of the rivers could "maybe" stand to be a little less smoothly curved, and a little more fractalized / jagged to more accurately represent changes in terrain surface and elevation - especially since the O.P.'s map seems to have a straight "Top Down" viewpoint - as opposed to being more isometrically stylized - but it's not my map - so to each their own.

    I would like to say that I do like this map (the original poster's map) a lot because it does have a very unique character. I like the font and terrain color choices a lot. This map has personality.
      us_maps_rivers.png
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2012
     
    Thanks for your comments. I have a tough time with rivers, and I may try using the fractal path for the rivers and see how it comes out. My b&w concept for the map was done in a top-down perspective, so you're right there. I never know how many rivers is too many- I feel that too many tributaries can clutter a map. Plus I noticed when I try and add tributaries, they "jump" to the edge of the map (i'm sure there is a code/ layer issue here). I will need to play with the settings.

    B&W reference map:

    http://forum.profantasy.com/comments.php?DiscussionID=3254&page=1#Item_6
    • CommentAuthorDogtag
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2012
     
    Wow! What a difference the map style makes! o_O
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2012
     
    Revised map with redone rivers.
      Avern_revised_rivers_small.jpg
  2.  
    OUTSTANDING!!!!!!! :)
  3.  
    A lot better! Congratulations my friend! Now you just need to break the sameness of the sea. Maybe put diferent tones of blue?
  4.  
    Generally on maps I've noticed three things that seem to be universal trends - both on real world maps - and on well done fictional ones - that are really good guidlines to remember I suppose:

    #1, There are really no set rules on where a river will begin or end - but generally the longest and widest rivers (like the Mississippi river, The Amazon River, The Brazos River, The Nile River, The Danube, etc.) - either start, end, or start AND end at delta spillways into larger lakes, seas, and oceans. Usually on continents and larger islands you'll have anywhere from one to ten or more of these "mega-rivers" that have larger delta systems. NOTE that the second largest / longest river in North America - the Mississippi river - begins in Minnesota, and terminates at a major delta spillway emptiing into the Gulf Of Mexico. I'd guess that roughly 30% of all of the major rivers in the U.S. connect to the Mississippi.

    #2, Most of your vegetation distributed on a given land mass will be associated with an adjoining body of water, i.e. Forests and swamps will be most numerous and dense along and around rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and coastal sea shores. Wetlands, Marshes, and Swamps are often found at the forking areas / branching origins of multiple river systems that connect or branch off of each other - and along / atop the shallowest areas of freshwater seas, lakes, and ponds in locations along shores that are nearest dry land.

    In short - wetlands, marshes, and swamps will be located primarily in FLOODPLAINS where flooding is relatively a common occurrance, either seasonally - or due to terrain orientation (local land elevations and the abundance of flow in sources).

    #3, Civilization LOVES water. Towns, cities, hamlets, villages, settlements, and camps will nearly ALWAYS be close to some kind of water source. Human civilization first began next to a river. The more geopolitical boundaries (political borders) a body of water intersects - the more settlements will be situated near it as a trade artery. The largest / longest body of water within any political division will have the highest concentration of civilized settlements (more accurately - POPULATION) within that division.
      800px-Mississippirivermapnew.jpg
      map.jpg
      map1.jpg
    • CommentAuthorsoldyne
    • CommentTimeSep 18th 2012
     
    The rivers are quite nice. your map is well done, but I personally don't like the style. The mountains and forests are ok, but, the hills look like little blisters which makes me think the map is 'infected' with something.

    anyway, geographically, the NE river looks like it is running down from the northern hills and then up into the southern hills. I would suggest removing some of the southern hills and letting the river flow into the greenish area (like the marshland you mentioned earlier). of course if its a fantasy map, water can flow in any direction you like.

    heck, my fantasy map has a 10 mile wide whirlpool which sucks in islands!
  5.  
    Posted By: soldyneThe rivers are quite nice. your map is well done, but I personally don't like the style. The mountains and forests are ok, but, the hills look like little blisters which makes me think the map is 'infected' with something.

    anyway, geographically, the NE river looks like it is running down from the northern hills and then up into the southern hills. I would suggest removing some of the southern hills and letting the river flow into the greenish area (like the marshland you mentioned earlier). of course if its a fantasy map, water can flow in any direction you like.

    heck, my fantasy map has a 10 mile wide whirlpool which sucks in islands!


    Actually soldyne - water can flow anywhere anyway, even in real world maps - like I said before. HOWEVER - you do have a good point in that forested areas (greenery) does tend to congregate around rivers.
  6.  
    Ok- I've been looking at some more maps - and reading a lot more junk (I'm taking care of my mother - so I'm spending a lot more time at my puter on standby, and a lot less time "attempting" sleep due to insomnia and coffee jitters, lol) - and I seem to be seeing a pattern here. In summary:

    #1, wetlands, swamps, and marshes are generally found in flood plains.

    #2, flood plains are generally found where rivers are thickest, and where they branch out - and in the shallows of lakes closest to the shoreline.

    #3, Rivers are thickest - and branch out - in areas of uniform lower elevation in comparison to the surrounding terrain - typically in the lowest regions of valleys, or areas that are generally flat or depressed terrain.

    #4, Warm, humid areas will have more swamps and marshes than any other - irregardless of whether or not they (other areas) fulfill the prior criteria - due to greater rain fall.

    The bottom graphics are an elevation map of the Continental United States, and a relative humidity map of the U.S..

    In both maps - the deeper greens are lower elevations and the browns / yellows / pinks / brighter greens are higher elevations. More water can be found in the eastern third of the U.S. because (A), it has a higher rainfall rate due to the influences of humidity transported up from the Gulf Of Mexico, and (B), because it is at lower elevations than the western and west central remaining two thirds of the continental U.S. (CLOSER TO SEA LEVEL = MORE MOISTURE!), rivers flow from higher to lower elevations = WIDER RIVERS, MORE RIVERS, MORE FORESTS, AND MORE SWAMPS at elevations CLOSER TO SEA LEVEL!

    hence - there is a greater abundance of rivers, streams, creeks, and wetlands in the Eastern third of the U.S., And thus - a greater abundance of reliable flood plains. Note the clustering patterns and abundances of river networks in prior maps that I've posted on this thread - specifically how tributaries are distributed along the Mississippi, and the location of the Mississippi river itself?

    Just wanted to give you some reference / research material Modric that I hope will be helpful / insightful / inspirational.

    Remember that the TOP MAP = ELEVATIONS, and the BOTTOM MAP = WETNESS:
      usa_toporelief_1968_l.jpg
      united-states-climate-humidity-map.png
  7.  
    Finally - here's a population density map of the Continental U.S. - compare this to the previous two maps...Hope that this is insightful - and useful for map planning. I wanted to give you some ideas for layout Modric.
      population-density.png
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2012
     
    This is great information. I appreciate the help. After I digest this, I'll share the finished product.
    • CommentAuthorHenrie61
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2012
     
    Love this map. Reminds me of the old D&D maps. Well done.

    Despite all the evidence that its perfectly "legal" still don't like the river that goes nowhere :-)
  8.  
    One question. What fond did you used? I loved the capital letters!
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2012
     
    The Font is Neverwinter Nights (from Forgotten Realms).
  9.  
    Posted By: ModricThe Font is Neverwinter Nights (from Forgotten Realms).


    Can you post a link? Or it is included on the annual that have the "Forgotten Realms Style"?
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2012
     
    It wasn't part of the style. I picked it off the internet for free: http://www.dafont.com/neverwinter.font
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 19th 2012
     
    Since I'm bored at work, I decided to join the discussion re: rivers.

    According to Wikipedia (and you know that's the most reliable source on the internet!),

    "A river is a natural watercourse,[1] usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, a lake, a sea, or another river. In a few cases, a river simply flows into the ground or dries up completely before reaching another body of water."

    And,

    "Most but not all rivers flow on the surface. Subterranean rivers flow underground in caves or caverns. Such rivers are frequently found in regions with limestone geologic formations."

    Even though I have changed the Veldta area to now have the rivers flow into the three grassland areas, the NE river could have either dried up or proceeded underground. The dissipation of the rivers and streams, either in or under ground, would contribute to the groundwater through the aquifier, which would explain the presence of vegetation that is not necessarily adjacent to the above ground waterways.

    I try to follow the principles that rivers generally flow from areas of higher elevation to lower elevation, and that their paths take the path of least resistance. That may not be true in every situation, but they are good rules of thumb!
  10.  
    I certainly hope that I was helpful with the data that I provided you modric. Your maps are wonderful - and I'm very excited about seeing how they might evolve.
    Also - I am very sorry if it seems that the images and rather wordy entries that I posted were a bit overtaking, that was not the intention.
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2012
     
    Thanks Terra.
      Avern_revised_rivers_small2.jpg
  11.  
    It is even better. Congratulations!
    • CommentAuthorHenrie61
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2012
     
    Yep, even better now.
    Great overland map for an adventure setting.
  12.  
    This is such a nice map. It has a classical "Greyhawkish" type feel to it.
    • CommentAuthorModric
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2012
     
    I've been struggling with finding a map style for overland maps. While there aren't a lot of symbols on this style, it has a very clean stylized look to it. Plus, with the sheet effects turn on, the symbols pop. This style brings me back to the Forgotten Realms Grey Box days!
  13.  
    I could suggest to you using basic symbols like the dot / star type symbols to indicate towns, and you could make some flag and shield symbols for countries, and such.
    • CommentAuthorChief
    • CommentTimeMay 20th 2013 edited
     
    Well done Mordric. This is still one of my favorite map styles.
    • CommentAuthorHenrie61
    • CommentTimeMay 21st 2013 edited
     
    Removed because the map moved.
    • CommentAuthorChief
    • CommentTimeMay 22nd 2013
     
    Apologies! Thanks for the nudge Henrie61! Map moved. Would love some feed back. Still learning.