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    • CommentAuthormike robel
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020 edited
     
    In the middle of the night (actually early this morning for me) I woke up thinking it would be neat to have a paper map that would be made up of large hexagons rather than individual sheets of paper. Obviously, there are no ready made large sheets of single hexes that will fit into a printer, so I thought putting it on an 11 x 17 (or larger) inch map, then "cropping" it to a "Super Hex" which I would then cut out. Then one would merely line up the hexes on the table to play.

    For whatever reason, I thought this would made isometric maps a little easier to draw (at least for me).

    So, my first step was to make an 11 x 17 inch map sheet (in this case it will be 11 x 17 kilometers) and then put a 1km hex onto it. (first photo). I was somewhat amazed by the resulting hexgird because it lined up correctly vertically with the top and bottom edge of the map, but not the left and right sides. Usually when I make a grid, it overlaps it in all directions.

    Then, I messed around until I got what looked like a properly apportioned 'super hex' placed. It seems to look right and scale right, but it makes me uneasy when I look at the middle left corner and then look at the middle right corner and note it does not end in the same way. But like I said, it seems to look okay and moving or rotating the hex didn't really seem to make it look right. Still, I think it will line up fine when you lay grids out on the table.

    Then, because I want the map section itself to be a hex, I covered up the rest of the sheet with two white polygons although perhaps I could have used the Polygon within a Polygon tool, but that confuses me.

    Is there another way to approach this? I know it is somewhat convoluted because one could certainly make isometric rectangular maps sheets to put together with a lot less effort.

    Lastly, how to get rid of the box on the right hand side? Just extend the white polygon to fill it, even though the points are not on the hex grid?

    We can also discuss why I think this is a good approach since it takes extra time to construct the sheet and I will have to cut them out by hand. But maybe it will make isometric maps easier for me.

    Thanks

    Mike
      Super Hex 1.JPG
      Super Hex 2.JPG
      Super Hex 3.JPG
    • CommentAuthorjmabbott
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020
     
    Have you tried using 2 hex grid sheets, 1 at 1km and the other at 10km or whatever underneath it?
    • CommentAuthormike robel
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020 edited
     
    DUH! No.

    [Edit:] That looks more betterer. Had to reposition it to do what I really wanted,but it lines up correctly. Thanks!
      Super Hex 4.JPG
    • CommentAuthorjmabbott
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020
     
    You're welcome mate. I was considering how to do exactly the same thing for maps I want to do in the future and must admit i hadn't tested it but thought it would work - more or less.
    • CommentAuthormike robel
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020
     
    After I looked at that, its actually easier to just draw the polygon using the Straight Poly Tool. The two grids seem to mess up the snap function. For this map which is 11 x 17 inches using a hex grid of 1.0, the larger hex works out to 7 hexes on a side.

    The problem for me is isometric maps always look artificial to me and don't have the richness of a topographic map. But with the topo map, you are restricted to one layout. Grr.
    • CommentAuthorjmabbott
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020
     
    Well, I wouldn't be doing it to create an ISO map, just a straight map. The smaller hex would be the one I snapped to, the larger just for reference on the final map. Your situation is a bit different. Have you played around with Perspectives? I've not looked at that yet but it may work for you.
    • CommentAuthormike robel
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020 edited
     
    I haven't tried perspectives. Most things I do are converting topographic maps to hex maps; which you can see my current main project in the thread entitled "Here I go again" where I reveal some of the trials and tribulations with the effort.

    http://forum.profantasy.com/comments.php?DiscussionID=9781&page=1
    • CommentAuthorjmabbott
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020
     
    F%$k me! that's a lot of work mate. I didn't read through the whole thread but I'm not going to be of any more help, my "rank" with CC3+ is Novice...you need Master at the very least!
    • CommentAuthormike robel
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020
     
    You are very kind. I am far from a master of CC3. I mostly rely on brute force and ignorance. I just trace what is there and then try to make it easy for people to read. You would be surprised at people who can't read topographic/contour maps. That is the 3rd or 4th time of done the map. But its almost finished. I keep tuning things here and there and I am play testing the game design now. Most other people here are really slick and many have been helpful in getting me to this place.
    • CommentAuthorjmabbott
    • CommentTimeJul 27th 2020
     
    Haha, that's how I do it! Bugger reading the instructions, just get straight in and work it out as you go - might take you 3 or 4 or possibly more times longer than it should but I guarantee you'll know what NOT to do next time! I must admit, however, to watching a number of YouTube videos to get going...the program is far too feature rich to wing it from the get go.

    Thankfully, topo maps hold no mystery for me. I'm far from an expert but I'd be able to navigate from A-B with nothing but a quality compass & map. A valuable skill I learned as a Cub Scout Leader a few years ago...and a skill anyone who spends time in the outdoors should learn. It doesn't matter whether you just hike along known fire trails or the like, you should still learn to use a map & compass, even at basic level like me, and have same for the area with you at all times - you never know when conditions can throw you a curve ball...
    • CommentAuthormike robel
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2020
     
    Ah yes. I have a GPS that talks to the satellites, but I also carry a compass. If I am going someplace historical (e.g. a battlefield) I buy the appropriate maps to I can pay more attention to the terrain and locate my photographs.